Miso Marinated Soft Boiled Eggs

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I always see pictures of marinated soft boiled eggs toping bowls of ramen, I don’t see them presented as just a side dish or snack which is how I like them, it’s like the deviled egg of Japan. Soft boiled eggs are peeled and marinated in an assortment of things, miso, soy sauce, mirin, sake, dashi, sugar and then let to sit for a few days in the fridge. Once fully marinated you slice them in half, pop them in your mouth and enjoy as a perfect snack.

Every time I make miso marinated eggs I look up a recipe or try to find my old recipe notes and can’t find exactly what I’m looking for so I end up wing it. They always turn out great but they would be more enjoyable if I had a trusty marinade to ensure they were perfect every time. So finally I did it, I managed to make a few batches to test different marinade ratios and find the one I like the best. But knowing me I’ll only half follow this recipe in the future because that’s the type of person I am, I can’t ever make anything the same.







Miso Marinated Soft Boiled Eggs


Ingredients

  • 6 eggs at room temperature
  • ¼ c water
  • ¼ c sake
  • ¼ c mirin
  • 2 tbsp. miso
  • 2 tbsp. soy sauce
  • 1 tsp. dashi powder

Directions

  1. It’s important that your eggs are are room temperature before cooking, you can place the eggs in warm water for a bit to help speed up that process.
  2. To a pot of boiling water add your eggs, turn the heat down to a simmer and cook your eggs for 5-6 minutes or cook them how you usually make soft boiled egg.
  3. Once the eggs are cooked shock them in ice water to stop the cooking process.
  4. While the eggs cooling make the marinade, do this in the container you plan to marinade the eggs in; I recommend a zip top plastic bag. Everything goes in and you can squish the ingredients around until combined into a smooth sauce.
  5. Pell your eggs, add them to the marinade and refrigerate for 3 days, flip the bag over at least once a day. After 3 days they are ready to eat but they should also be removed from the marinade otherwise they have a tendency to get rubbery.

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