brewery

Fun Friday: Alcohol, Marijuana, and Tech

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Happy Friday everybody! A friend of the office recently noted that we haven’t been discussing beer nearly enough lately. And it turns out she was right. After our office’s first, real recreational marijuana forecast last year and the Oregon Vice research and presentation I did, our office has been mostly focused on the evolving macro environment this year (more next week). Given this, and the fact that our office recently reconvened our marijuana forecast advisory group, I thought I should rectify the oversight.

Let’s start first with an update to the comparison you never knew you wanted, but are now glad you have. Over the past decade, or since the start of the Great Recession, Oregon’s thriving alcohol, and marijuana sectors have added more jobs than one of the state’s economic pillars: the high-tech cluster. Of course these economic sectors are not directly related, but instead are being used to help frame the discussion for just how fast, and how many jobs are being added here in the state.

We use this chart regularly in our presentations to discuss a variety of legitimate economic topics, including the transition from hardware to software within the tech industry, in addition to the true economic impact from vice sectors lies not with the growing and retailing of the products, but in all the ancillary and support industries that grow along with consumer demand and evolving markets. At its roots, Oregon’s alcohol cluster is value-added manufacturing where firms take raw ingredients — many of which are locally-grown — and turn them into a much more valuable products sold across the state and increasingly around the world. Furthermore, a plurality of brew system manufacturers in the U.S. call Oregon home. So when a new brewery opens up elsewhere in the country, there is a good probability they are buying and using Oregon-made equipment.

Our office’s hope is this type of cluster similarly develops around the recreational marijuana industry as well. Prices continue to plunge as the market matures and marijuana commoditizes. But increasing market activity in extracting oils, creating creams, making edibles in addition to hopefully building up the broader cluster of lab testing equipment, and branding and design firms, means Oregon will see a bigger economic impact from legalization.

Note that the reason for the range of marijuana-related employment in the chart is due to data availability. Our friends over at Employment do a great job of matching employment records to OLCC licensed businesses. Their latest count totals 5,300 jobs in Oregon. Now, these are payroll jobs (technically jobs subject unemployment insurance). Given harvest seasonality, part-time work, independent contractors and the like in a still federally illegal industry, it is reasonable to expect these payroll jobs to be more of a lower bound. However, if we turn to OLCC marijuana worker permits, those currently number 36,000 which is too high. Triangulating a more reasonable estimate — either via a rough sales to employee ratio, or scaling by a similar factor as food handler cards to food service jobs — shows there are probably about 11,000 or 12,000 marijuana-related jobs in the state today.

Finally, I have also been updating my Oregon brewery production numbers to track start-ups, the state’s legacy breweries, and also closures or failures. Given the outright declines in the beer industry overall, and slowing growth in craft beer sales, there has been quite a lot of hand-wringing over what it means. No doubt, retail shelf space is limited and the competition is fierce. Some breweries are seeing substantial declines in their sales and production. However that does not mean the industry overall is unhealthy. In fact, brewpubs continue to thrive, and some of the bigger breweries are revamping their tasting rooms, and adding more locations for better direct-to-consumer sales given they maximize revenue per pint this way. Elon Glucklich at The Register-Guard has great article on this, with a focus on Eugene breweries.

However, as Warren Buffet said, “only when the tide goes out do you discover who has been swimming naked.” For breweries this means that business plans, practices and operations matter considerably more in a world of slowing growth then they do during the go-go days of double-digit gains every year. Slower growth can strain business finances, eventually leading to more closures or failures. So, are we seeing this here in Oregon? So far the answer is no. Yes, the absolute number of brewery closures has risen in recent years, but the closure rate has barely budged. The reason is Oregon has quadrupled the number of breweries in the state over the past 15 years. As such, we should see more closures given there are so many more potential places to run into issues — be they low sales, high costs, personal problems, or the like. To date, Oregon breweries are closing at a significantly lower rate than other types of businesses across the state.

UPDATE: It it also helpful to put the number of closures in perspective with the number of openings. Economists tend to refer to this as churn. There are always new businesses forming and others going out of business. Additionally around 1 in 8 workers in Oregon are gaining or losing a job every single quarter. While topline economic indicators tend to be pretty stable, or show solid gains, there is an incredible amount of churn below the surface. This occurs in good times and in bad. So far, even as brewery closures are rising some overall, the number of new breweries in the state continues to outpace closures by a margin of 4 to 1 in the last three years.

Next week I will have a few posts on the macro outlook, as we meet with our economic advisors to nail down the 2019-21 biennium outlook. Our forecast will be released Nov 14, at which time we will also have an updated recreational marijuana forecast that incorporates all of the latest data and input from our advisors.

Last but not least, a special thank you to Beth Dyer at Employment for helping me get all of the industry data to build the clusters!

Source:Oregon Economic News

Elk Horn Brewery Opens

8-29 elk horn picEUGENE, Ore. — After a former Carl’s Jr. Restaurant near the University of Oregon campus sat vacant for more than a year, local entrepreneurs have developed it into a brewery.

The Elk Horn Brewery opened just two days ago, and they say they’ve been swamped.

They brew their own cider, beer, and produce their own meat.

Stephen Sheehan, the owner Stephen Elk Horn, is originally from Mississippi and says the restaurant is a twist between two worlds–the South and the Pacific Northwest. They designed it like a lodge, with some Southern cuisine.

“We have a wild mushroom over polenta cakes, ragu that’s kind of a Northwest-Southern fusion thing because we use local ingredients. We use local mushrooms,” Sheehan said.

Sheehan said they ready for a swarm of folks to head to brewery Saturday, as it’s the first Ducks football game of the season.

Proposed FDA Rule Impacts Breweries

4-12-breweryMEDFORD, Ore. – Local breweries are arguing a proposed FDA rule that they say could hurt both them and local farmers.

The rule applies to spent grains. Those by products of the brewing process are normally sold or given to local farmers to use as feed.

But the FDA rule would put restrictions on how those grains are handled, restrictions that to small breweries would be so impractical that it would force them to instead throw those grains in landfills.

“I’m one of hundreds of breweries in this Southern Oregon, Central Oregon area,” said Opposition Brewing Owner Nick Ellis. “If we all have to start sending grain to landfills, it’s really going to choke things up.”

A small, nano-brewery can produce 200 pounds of spent grain in a week dry weight. They say disposing those into a landfill would eliminate the win-win situation they say has worked so well for breweries and farmers.

Oregon’s Bay Area: Game On

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We love Oregon’s Bay Area. Coos Bay/North Bend is a great little town. It’s changed a lot in the years since we lived there in the late 80’s and I hope it’s on the verge of greatness. There’s a new brewpub in Coos Bay and it just upped the competition – changed the game. The problem will be, can others compete or will they be ignored.

Motel: We stay at the Red Lion because quite frankly you get a great deal. They have clean, large remodeled rooms with comfortable beds and only 92 dollars a night for a king.

We love checking out restaurants and this time found a gold mine at Coos Bay’s first Brew Pub. 7 Devils is a great spot in the heart of town. The atmosphere is perfect (needs more inside seating) and the food is great. The beer is amazing for a new brewery. Usually it takes a brewer time to get a good recipe but the couple that creates this beer is already there. We had an amazing time and the servers were perfect. They were friendly and efficient, the kind of servers you feel good about tipping.

photo-484The rest of our meals were not so great and left us feeling like Coos Bay needs to step it up a notch or three.

We had dinner at a place called “Little Italy.” We’ve eaten there before and weren’t overly impressed but there aren’t a lot of choices so we decided to give it a go again and will not repeat our mistake.

You know you’ve made a mistake when you take a bite and realize your wife could have done much better at home. The whole evening was awkward. The restaurant is nice but something just doesn’t work. The waitress we had felt nervous. We left feeling gross.

We tried to eat lunch at the Empire Café, a place we have bragged about before, but they are no longer open for lunch. They had great food the last several times we were there but when we got to the place the sign said: “Open at 2pm.” Why would you open a restaurant at 2pm? If you do go to Coos Bay I’d definitely give them a try because their baked goods are amazing and the food was good. Just don’t plan to eat lunch at a normal time of day or go for dinner.

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We ended up at a place called “Monica’s” for lunch. Monica must have a lot of friends who “Yelp” because the ratings look good. We got there at 1:30 and the lunch spot is out of bread. What, you are out of bread? I hate to be “Crusty” but how does a lunch place run out of bread? We were starving and decided on a salad special and it was terrible. For $10 bucks we had Romaine lettuce with a few other goodies (if you can call them that) on the salad, oh and Olive Oil as a dressing. We paid extra for turkey and found a few tiny chunks under the salad, nothing to gobble about. The coffee was bad and the meal too expensive. Monica was nice enough but the restaurant too was an awkward spot.

Oregon’s Bay Area needs to pick up the pace. Business owners might want to travel to other places and see what others are doing and find a way to make their own mark on good food, great services and friendly staff.

On the way home we stopped by the Sourdough Bakery in Winchester Bay and bought a pizza skin to bring home. We also bought a bottle of wine we’ve never seen before. It’s a really cool place with great pizza. You can even do take-n-bake. They also bake fresh bread and make sandwiches. Oh, and the owner makes these cool jams and preserves. It’s a great place to stop.

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But the best place of the trip is Harbor Light in Reedsport. We passed by this place for 20 years. A year ago we drove by and saw they had “Fixed it up” so we stopped. We had a Tuna steak sandwich and it was amazing and the restaurant is really cool inside. This time we stopped by and ordered the tri tip salad. Look at the picture it was as good as it looks. The Harbor Light smokes its tri tip, chicken and pork. The staff is great and the food is just so good. You will not be disappointed they even serve great beer and wine. The only thing I would change is they need better coffee.

I truly do care about Oregon’s Bay area. I spent my early years in my former career there. People in Coos Bay are very, very good to me so this advice comes with a desire to make the community thrive.

Go look around and see what others are doing. Find out what works for others and then flatter them by copying what they do but do it even better. Competition is good for the soul. I know we live in a world that tries to quiet the competition rather than use it to learn but you need to do the latter.

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Now that’s a tri-tip salad – thank you Harbor Lights Family Restaurant – once again the food highlight.

If you don’t feel like traveling outside the area head downtown and pay a visit to 7 Devils or drive to Reedsport and ask some questions at Harbor Light. Walk in the door, grab a beer, order some food and take plenty of notes. If you ignore these places you will lose. If you find yourself saying this and that won’t work put a closed sign on your door right now. The folks at 7 Devils and Harbor Lights get it and let me warn you now, it’s “Game On.”

An Afternoon at The Agrarian Ales Hop Farm

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I enjoyed my drive along the curvy roads heading out into the country; the windows down and the music cranked.  I wondered what I would find at Agrarian Brewery as I passed beautiful fields of corn, and stacks of hay baled 6 high, 8 wide and commanding attention.

Agrarian Hops  Image | Sandy Harris
Agrarian Hops Image | Sandy Harris

As I turned onto West Crossroads, I thought for sure Siri (my navigator) had gotten mixed up!  Surely there could not be a brewery out here.  This time of year it is a familiar sight seeing those large sprinklers going off in the fields. This one in particular caught my attention because it reached the other side of the road.  I began my plan of attack, sneaking up on the sprinkler, to time it just right when I saw the sign for Agrarian, this side of the water.

I found a spot to park, collected my things and headed for the tasting room.  There were people sitting on picnic benches outside and dogs playing, there was live music, one man standing at the microphone with his guitar and singing and the sound that came from this voice and his instrument was amazing!

Leroy and his bucket
Leroy and his bucket

There were people walking around with their glasses of beer, people tossing bean bags playing Corn Hole, there was a man out in the field tossing a stick for his dog, and another dog with a five gallon bucket and happy written all over his face!  Yep, I later found out his name was Leroy and when things got a little mellow, Leroy would get his bucket out.  He tossed that thing all over and showed it who was boss.

Agrarian is very dog friendly and they encourage you to bring your best buddies!  I know right?  Who else offers that? 

There were people of all ages visiting and kids playing on the swing set and slide.  I walked around the backside of the brewery and found more picnic tables, with even more people, casually sitting and talking surrounded by music and laughter, the fields of chile’s and hops were the backdrop.

Delilah at Agrarian  Image | Sandy Harris
Delilah Image | Sandy Harris

Of course I couldn’t help myself so I took some photographs.  Hops are a pretty thing!

I met Ben Tilley; owner of Agrarian.  I needed something cold to stave off the heat, I had a feeling I was in the right place.  Ben asked me what I would like.

“A girly beer” I said giggling…  I don’t know a thing about beer so I won’t even try to pretend but I do know there are some real “man beers” on the market and I didn’t want anything like that, razors cost enough these days if you know what I mean.

Ben gave me a sample of Delilah and by my expression he could tell I really liked it and ordered me a tulip.  While he finished up with some previous business, I found a picnic bench and became best friends with Delilah.  Oh such a beautiful beer!  A Belgian Blonde Ale with different local honey addition’s.  A different honey source is in each batch.  The one I drank had maple blueberry honey.  The batch prior to mine had turnip honey, with a different honey batch coming out soon!  I know why it is served in a tulip glass, because the alcohol volume is 7.5% and if you had too many you would be walking on your two lips.

Ben Tilley Image | Sandy Harris
Ben Tilley Image | Sandy Harris

Ben joined me a short time later and shared the story of how Agrarian came to be.  The story began many years ago when the family; his parents and 4 other siblings moved to the farm in 1985.   Selling the fruits of their labor at farmers markets over the years, the kids grew up surrounded with this culture.  Once they grew up, as all kids do, they left home to find their way in life.  It wasn’t until 8 years ago when they came back that an idea came to mind.

Nate Tilley began to brew his own beers while attending the U of O and was good at it.  One day he approached Ben and suggested they start a brewery, and that is how a passion began.

Able to purchase the pole barn from their parents, the boys;  Ben and his brother Nate transformed the barn with their hands from the ground up into what is now Agrarian Ale Brewery. I was so comfortable there it is nearly unexplainable.  It was almost like going home.  Ben and Nate have turned it into a wonderful place to be.

Chie and Hop fields of Agrarian Image | Sandy Harris
Chile and Hop fields
Image | Sandy Harris

I asked Ben how they came up with the name Agrarian.  With pride, he told me about his brother Lucas who is away at college on the east coast.  Lucas is the one who came up with the name, the logo design and the T-shirts.

“Agrarian means simply ‘farm life’ to us.  The farm, the tending of the land, is the centerpiece of our way of life.  We value rural society and the independent farmer”

One of the amazing things about their business is that it is as local as it gets.  From the farm up the road where they get their honey to the food they prepare for their dinners.  Most everything is purchased within a 30 mile range of the brewery, cutting down their ecological footprint.  Agrarian even recycles their water back into the farmland.

Agrarian hops Image | Sandy Harris
Image | Sandy Harris

Ben shared some of the local farms that Agrarian purchases from.  Lonesome Whistle Farm in Junction City. Agrarian uses their stone ground corn polenta, heirloom popcorn and dry beans, they have also used their corn in some beers that they have made.

They have utilized several wheat varieties of grains and legumes as well as oats and barley from Hunton Farms in Junction City.  Fern Edge Goat Dairy in Lowell; Chevre, aged goat cheese and raw milk cheese.  Ben describes it as a beautiful family goat farm and creamery.
They get organic hazelnuts from Honor Earth Farm in Pleasant HIll and roast them with their own chile powders… “very tasty” Ben states.  The only items they don’t get locally is the blue cheese which comes from Rogue Creamery and salt from Portland.
As Ben and I visited, I took a closer look at the sitting area just in front of the tasting room and realized the pretty vines climbing up the post were actual hops, so simple yet so inviting.  I wasn’t afraid there were spiders anywhere near me or the vines, this is how comfortable it is out there!
4 ft Jenga Game
4 ft Jenga Game

We went on a tour of the grounds, circling the facility.  Out back you could see obvious signs of construction happening.  A new kitchen was being built around a newly built wood fired oven called a Cobb Oven.  Max and Eva Edelson of Firespeaking located in Deadwood Oregon built the stove right where it sits.  They are hoping for construction to finish up on the new kitchen in about a months time.

Ben showed me the trailer they use for Saturday Market!  Yep, you can find them down there on tap.  Because they are agriculture, they are able to do this, so if you find yourself downtown Eugene, check them out.  You can also find Ma and Pa Tilley roasting their chile’s at the market as well.  Springfield has its own market on Friday, you can find Agrarian there as well!

Each year, Agrarian holds their hop harvest the last two weekends in August, welcoming the public to partake in this fun event.  $20.00 gets the car (and all the occupants you can fit into it) into the festival!  This is encouraged to cut back on fuel consumption.  Your $20.00 will be exchanged for tickets to use how ever you wish; to purchase a beer or two (you are going to want more than one, I guarantee it) or use towards food.  They also have non-alcoholic beverages available.

Agrarian hops Image | Sandy Harris
Agrarian Hops
Image | Sandy Harris

Chefs Brad Burnheimer (Leroy’s dad) and Chef Ben Hoffman will be roasting a pig in the ground.

“We will be sourcing a lot of chiles, tomatoes, eggplant, squash and beans from our own farm Crossroads Farm, my parents farm.  The menu will reflect the seasons bounty from our local farmers”

Brad also runs Burnheimer Meat Company (charcutieri specialty cured meats).  It was really hard to concentrate on our conversation as I kept smelling the wonderful aroma’s coming from the smoke house.  Their menu changes daily, as they get their foods fresh each day.

Agrarian does not bottle any of their beer.  They want to stay small, yet you can find them on tap at many places!  Check out their list of where you can find their brews here but I would highly recommend heading out to see where it all began.

Agrarian Image | Sandy Harris
Image | Sandy Harris

Open year round, Agrarian is like going home.  It was hard to say good-bye when the time came for me to leave, but with a promise to head back (with friends) we parted ways. Delilah will always be on my mind…

Tell em Sandy sent you and have a tulip for me!

See ya out there!

Agrarian is located between Coburg and Harrisburg.  You can find more information on their website or facebook page.

 

Barrel Aged Brews – Part III: Firestone Walker 15

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–Julia Crowley, EDN

In October, I sampled my first ever barrel aged beer, Oakshire’s Hellshire II. The intense bourbon, vanilla, coffee and caramel flavors of the Hellshire II urged me to explore the world of barrel aged beers, so I later attended the Winter and Strong Ale Fest at 16 Tons where I discovered a world of international and domestic beers packed with flavors from ginger, nutmeg and cinnamon, to fig, molasses and caramel; hence, the beginning of my love affair with barrel aged beer.

There's a brewing company in Paso Robles, California that has my full attention, and that brewery is Firestone Walker Brewing Company.

One of the beers I sampled during the Winter and Strong Ale Fest that had me seriously intrigued was Firestone Walker 14. Complex flavors of brown sugar, maple syrup, dark chocolate, cherry and coffee flourished, and I was instantly hooked. I took home a bottle of Firestone Walker 14, and inside the box that the bottle was housed in was a note from Firestone Walkers Brewmaster, Matt Brynildson. Included in the note was a brief history on their barrel aged specialty brews:

The Bier Stein after the crowd dispersed

“Since founding our brewery in 1996, we have specialized in the rare art of brewing beer in oak barrels. In the fall of 2006, we released a limited edition oak-aged strong ale called 10 to commemorate our 10th anniversary. The experience was greater than any of us could have ever imagined. We now present 14, our fifth release in what has become an autumnal rite at our brewery.”

The note continued with information regarding the production of their 14th anniversary beer, and I learned that this beer not only had brewers involved, but winemakers as well. Five winemakers from the esteemed Paso Robles wine region used their blending expertise in a single blending session of six different Firestone Walker beers. The finished product is a beer that deserves to be served in a wine glass, and I truly enjoyed every sip of its complex goodness.

David Walker talks about Firestone Walker 15

When I heard that Bier Stein was having a release party for the highly anticipated Firestone Walker 15, in addition to a partial tap takeover of other Firestone Walker beers, I marked my calendar and called my beer enthusiast friends-it was a date.

When we arrived at the Bier Stein, it was elbow room only, so we got in line to order a glass of the Firestone Walker 15. With the purchase of the Firestone Walker 15, we also received a ticket to sample the 14, which was somewhere towards the back of the bar. The bartender pointed in the general direction, but we decided to search out an available table instead. We saw one table that had empty seats but a tabletop filled with glasses, so we headed in its direction in hopes that it had been vacated. As luck would have it, the table was taken; however, its occupier invited us to sit down, and he politely introduced himself to us, “David Walker, nice to meet you.”

The giddy school-girl in me almost showed its face, but I kept my cool and dove into a conversation with David Walker, owner of Firestone Walker Brewing Company, about his companies captivating barrel aged beers.

Firestone Walker 15 and 14

Walker explained that the goal of his brewing company’s barrel aged and blending program is to create several different forms of high gravity, complex, oak-aged beers that can be blended together to achieve stellar and harmonious new flavors. Just as I discovered from the brewmasters note in the Firestone Walker 14 box, those balanced and melodic flavors are acquired by the blending expertise of selected Paso Robles winemakers, thus creating the depth of character that I was currently discovering in the Firestone Walker 15 anniversary ale.

Firestone Walker 15 is a deep mahogany brown with a light tan creamy head. Much like wine, this beer needed to be sniffed first, and a wave of aromas blasted from the glass: vanilla, wood, coconut, almond and bourbon. The flavors came in waves, starting with vanilla extract, caramel and brandy and ending with an everlasting finish of intense toasted oak, chocolate and toffee. This brew had rhythm.

Walker continued with an overview of the eight different beers that were blended to create this symphonic brew:

  • Helldorado – a blonde barley wine aged in bourbon barrels and brandy barrels
  • Sticky Monkey – an English barley wine, also aged in bourbon and brandy barrels
  • Bravo – also aged in bourbon and brandy barrels, this is an Imperial Brown Ale
  • Double Double Barrel Ale – a double strength English Pale Ale that was aged 100 percent in retired Firestone Union Barrels
  • Good Foot -an American barley wine aged in bourbon barrels
  • Velvet Merkin – a traditional oatmeal stout aged in bourbon barrels
  • Parabola – a Russian Imperial Oatmeal Stout aged in bourbon barrels
  • Double Jack – 100 percent Fresh-n-Hoppy, 100 percent stainless steel Double India Pale Ale
Cheers!

Each of the eight beers contribute different characteristics which achieve the unmatched, complex flavors found in this luscious brew. Surprised that all beers blended were barrel aged except one, Walker retrieved a sample of the stainless steel Double India Pale Ale, Double Jack, so I could taste it along side the barrel aged Firestone Walker 15, and the contrast between the two were astounding. Much like what a stainless steel white wine looks when placed next to an oak aged red wine, the Double Jack had a golden pale color, and it was much lighter on the palate. Although the Double Jack was excellent, the countless characteristics found in the barrel aged Firestone Walker 15 continued to marvel my taste buds like none other.

Walker is devoted to his one-of-a-kind brewing company, and his level of knowledge and passion for barrel aged and blended beers was clearly impressive as he educated me on the art of brewing. A trip to Paso Robles is no doubt in my near future, and I not only plan to visit the Firestone Walker Brewery, but I’d like to visit the wineries of the winemakers that participated in the blending session that created the incredibly distinctive and savory Firestone Walker 15.

*photos courtesy of Maria Curtis

 

Barrel Aged Brews – Part I: Oakshire Hellshire II

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— Julia Crowley, EDN

Vanilla, cherries, molasses, figs, pumpkin, coffee, chocolate and caramel. As much as this appears to be a list of ingredients needed to prepare a holiday feast, they are actually just a few of the many flavor profiles found in barrel-aged brews. Because of these many distinctive flavors, the demand for barrel aged beers is on the rise and is a growing trend within the American craft and micro brewing industry.

Much like a high quality red wine, barrel aged beers have a longer shelf life, are more complex and tend to be more expensive than other beers. Aged beers also have a higher content of alcohol and are usually dark or sour. Since I love complex red wines that tend to impart the oak flavors that are acquired from aging in oak barrels, I was driven to experience the flavors of barrel aged brews, hoping that they, too, would be complex and contain flavors from the barrel used for aging. Having never tried a beer that was aged in a barrel, I decided to attend the release party for Oakshire Brewing Company’s bourbon barrel aged beer, Hellshire II.

Oakshire's Overcast Espresso Stout and Hellshire II

After arriving at the Oakshire brewery, I was immediately impressed by the amount of people that were waiting in line to try this just-released micro brew. The line of beer enthusiasts came out of the tasting room, into the parking lot and almost past the fence that surrounds the brewery. I took a place in the line and watched as people came out with tasters, snifters, pints, bottles and cases of beer. The people in line around me talked about the release of the new beer, and more people than not were wearing Oakshire logo hats, T-shirts or sweatshirts. Once inside the bustling tasting room, I ordered a taster of the Hellshire II, which is barrel aged, and a taster of the Overcast Espresso Stout, which isn’t barrel aged.

Both of these beers were very dark brown, almost black, in color and the Espresso Stout had a light tan head while the Hellshire II had creamy brown head. The Espresso Stout is an oatmeal stout, which was brewed with beans from a Eugene coffee roaster, and the medium-bodied flavors definitely showcased the espresso beans along with a malty, chocolatey finish. The Hellshire II is an Imperial Stout that was aged in bourbon barrels for seven months. Initial flavors consisted of oak and bourbon with hints of vanilla, and finished with intense yet balanced coffee and caramel flavors. Of the two, I preferred the Hellshire II, and without hesitation, I bought my first ever wax-dipped, spooky-labeled, fifteen-dollar bottle of barrel aged beer.

Wax drippings create an eerie yet fun look to the Hellshire II bottle

Before departing, I met up with two of Oakshire’s ambassadors who gave a group tour of the brewery. Of the six people in the group, I was the only person that wasn’t a home brewer; I simply wanted to check out the digs that were used to create the impressive Hellshire II.

The tour began at the Oakshire silo that houses the two-row Canadian malt grain that is the base of most beers brewed at Oakshire. Ambassador Jacque Barton described the process of making the brew. From that silo, the grains are brought into the mill room by way of an auger system. During this “hot” side of the operation, the grain goes into a grist hopper and is made into what they call “mash.”

The mash then goes into another machine where they make the wort, add in hops and add flavors for that particular batch. From there it goes into a whirlpool tank where the movement of water forces the impurities to settle on the bottom.

At this point, the beer is too hot to add the yeast, so it goes through a cooling process. Cold water is pushed into a radiator, and as the hot beer passes by, the cold water cools the brew to about 70 degrees, and the water heats up in the process. Now hot, the water gets put into a water tank outside the brewery that can then be used for another brew cycle. Since the water quality in the Willamette Valley is excellent, the water doesn’t need to be filtered, and it can be used for a couple brew cycles.

This tanks name is "Chunk"

Once the beer is cooled down, it’s moved to the “cold” side of the operation. Barton said this is “where all the magic happens.” This is when the yeast are added, and they start going to town by chomping on the sugar while producing carbon dioxide and alcohol — in other words, fermenting.

Once the yeast are done breaking the brew down, the beer is then moved to the bright tank where the beer sits for about 10 days, depending on beer style. After that, the beer it is pumped out from the top of the tank and can then be bottled.

For barrel aged beer, the beer goes into bourbon, whiskey or rum barrels, to name a few, and is aged for varying lengths of time.

Once we were in the room that housed the bright tanks, I noticed that the tanks all had different names. I learned from ambassador Dan Potts that the names on the tanks were given by investors. Instead of obtaining a bank loan for the very expensive tanks, which average somewhere around $75,000 per tank, the owners turned to investors, and these investors, which included friends and family, were invited to name the tanks that they helped purchase.

After my experience at Oakshire’s release of the Hellshire II, it’s easy to understand why the popularity of barrel aged beer is on the rise. With the unique vanilla, caramel and coffee flavors that I discovered in my first-ever tasting of a barrel aged beer, I’ve decided to delve into the world of these diverse micro brews and share my learning and tasting experiences with you through a series of Barrel Aged Brews articles, right here on Eugene Daily News. Cheers!

Wine Down Eugene

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Julia Crowley, EDN

A great weekend to wine down

I’ve been spending the last few days shopping for groceries and stocking up on local wine and beer that I’ll be sharing with friends and family over Thanksgiving weekend, and I’m truly looking forward to cherished time with loved ones.

Selecting stellar local wine to serve during Thanksgiving dinner has not been a difficult task for me since moving to the bountiful Willamette Valley wine region. However, this year I’m on a mission to not only serve excellent local wine, but to serve local craft brews as well.

Recently, I’ve delved into the world of barrel-aged brews, which are in high demand because of their unique flavors and aging potential. I attended the release party of Oakshire’s Hellshire II bourbon barrel-aged beer, and I spent several hours at 16 Tons’ ‘Winter and Strong Ale Fest’ tasting beers that were aged in wine, whiskey and even rum barrels. The distinctive flavors that result in these aged beers are incredibly savory and gratifying, and I can’t wait to pair them with some of the foods I’ll be serving on Thanksgiving Day. I’m also excited about an article I’m currently writing that’s all about these fantastic aged brews, which will be published soon, right here on Eugene Daily News.

Crafted local beers are a great match with the holiday trimmings

Aside from preparing for and enjoying the great feast on Thanksgiving Day, I’ll be taking advantage of the many events happening around town and in wine country during the long holiday weekend. On Friday, I won’t be missing the rare chance to take in the breathtaking views that surround the original Iris Vineyards tasting room while enjoying their fabulous Pinot Noir, in addition to visiting some of the other spectacular wineries in the southern Willamette Valley. On Saturday, I’ll be quacking for the Ducks at Autzen Stadium while tailgating with King Estate Winery for the Civil War game against Oregon State University. To finish off the long weekend, on Sunday, I’ll be heading south to explore the many wineries of the Umpqua Valley. This will be a great opportunity to pick up some excellent artisan winter warming red wines, like Reustle Prayer Rock’s Tempranillo and Melrose Vineyard’s Baco Noir.

Although the long weekends festivites may catch up with me next week, I’ll be thankful for every minute spent with friends and family while enjoying the multiple bounties that Oregon brings us year round, and especially during the holidays.

Cheers and Happy Thanksgiving! ~Julia

Wine Bars & Wine Shops

16 Tons (Supreme Bean location): Tue. 6-9 pm, Women’s Only Tasting and pre-show for “The Love of Beer,” a documentary celebrating women in the craft beer industry. 2864 Willamette #500, Eugene.

Le Bar at 5th Street Public Market/Marché: This new bar has an incredible wine list. 296 East Fifth Ave., Eugene.

Marché Restaurant: Sun. 6:30 pm, Sunday family style Supper. $25 per person, wine by the carafe and specials. 296 East Fifth Ave., Eugene.

Marché Provisions: Fri. 5-7 pm, Free Friday Wine Tasting. Each week a selection of wines will be available for tasting. 296 East Fifth St., Eugene.

Washburne Cafe: Fri. 5-8 pm, appetizers, local wine and beer, and live music with Jazz du Jour. 326 Main St., Springfield.

Oakshire Brewing: Sat. 12-4 pm, newly remodeled tasting room will be open and food is available for purchase from Delacata Food Cart. 1055 Madera St., Eugene.

Wineries without Walls (wine shop & tasting room): Fri. 2-6 pm, grand opening weekend celebration and wine tasting with Kandarian Wine Cellars, Spencer Creek Vineyard and Abbelone Vineyard; Sat. 2-6 pm, wine tasting with William Rose Wines, Kandarian Wine Cellars and Abbelone Vineyard. Enjoy snack and surprises for the grand opening celebration. This wine shop and tasting room showcases local wines and is located inside the Fern Ridge Chamber of Commerce Visitor’s Center in Veneta. 24949 Hwy. 126, Veneta.

Mac’s at the Vets Club: Wed. 6-9 pm, Wine, Jazz & Variety Show with Gus Russell & Paul Biondi. A different Oregon winery is featured each week. $8 Burger and Brew night too. 1626 Willamette St., Eugene.

Authentica Wines: Tue.-Fri. 11 am – 6 pm and Sat. 10 am – 5 pm. wine tasting available every Saturday at the Wine Bar, and on the first Friday of each month during the Art Walk. With a focus on artisan, small production wines for every budget, you’re bound to find something you love at this wine shop. 766 West Park St., Eugene.

Territorial Vineyards and Wine Co.: Fri., Sat. and Sun. $7 Tasting Flight, local brews from Ninkasi and Oakshire. Fri. 3-9 pm, live music starting at 6 pm with Brooks Robertson; Sat. 3-9 pm, live music starting at 6 pm with Brook Adams; Sun. 3-7 pm, live music starting at 3 pm with Ally Losik. Unveiling of the expanded tasting room happens this weekend along with special offers of select wines and varietals from other producers. 907 West Third Ave., Eugene.

Café 440: Wed., all day. Wednesday Wine Flights for the month of November: California Rodney Strong red wines and Oregon whites from Erath, Montinore and Stone Wolf. Three pours for $10.50. 440 Coburg Rd., Eugene.

B2 Wine Bar: Happy hour is Mon.-Fri., 4-6 pm, and 9-10 pm; Thu. and Sat., outdoor barbecue. Loads of northwest wines offered here. 2794 Shadow Dr., Eugene.

Broadway Wine Merchants: Fri. 5-7 pm, Free Friday Wine Tasting. 17 Oakway Center, Eugene.

LaVelle Club Room
at 5th Street Market: Open during construction! Wed. 5-8 pm half off glass pours for ladies; Thurs. and Fri. 6-8 pm, live music. 296 East Fifth Ave., Eugene.

Sam’s Place Tavern: Sat. watch Oregon and OSU game; every booth has its own flat screen TV in addition to 22 plasma TVs; sports bar with a great wine list, 21 glass pours, all under $7! Wine list includes some excellent Oregon & northwest wines. 825 Wilson St., Eugene.

Red Agave: Excellent wine list including Oregon’s finest from King Estate, Territorial, Evesham Wood and Cristom, to name just a few; it’s impressive. 454 Willamette St., Eugene.

Ambrosia Restaurant and Bar: Mon. – Fri. 4-6 pm, happy hour wine and drink specials. 174 East Broadway Ave., Eugene.

Cork and Bottle Shoppe: Fri. 4 pm, free wine or beer tasting weekly. The Cork & Bottle Shoppe is one of Oregon’s only liquor stores that carry a large selection of local and international wine and craft beer in addition to liquor. 812 Beltline Rd., Springfield.

Sundance Wine Cellars: Fri. 5-7 pm, Frugal Friday wine tasting with Mario; Sat. 5-7 pm,   featuring local and regional wineries; wineries announced the day of on their Facebook page. 2441 Hilyard St., Eugene.

Jiffy Market: Fri. 5-7 pm, free wine tasting, house picks and pours; Sat. 6-10 pm. Purchase a whole sandwich from the deli and receive a Ninkasi pint for $2. 3443 Hilyard St., Eugene.

Café Zenon: Tue. Fifty percent off bottles of wine; Mon-Fri. 5-6:30 pm $1 off glasses of wine and pints of beer. Find King Estate’s Domaine Pinot Gris and Capitello’s Sauvignon Blanc here at half off on Tuesdays. 898 Pearl St,. Eugene.

Izumi Sushi and Grill: Like sushi & wine? Izumi has great sushi and they offer local wine and beer from Hinman, King Estate, Ninkasi and Oakshire. 2773 Shadow View Dr., Eugene.

Sabai Café and Bar: Wines by the glass, $6 and under. Excellent local wines from Territorial, King Estate, Capitello and Benton-Lane. 27 Oakway Center, Eugene.

Agate Alley Laboratory: Sat. 10 pm, Late Night at The Lab with $1 off glass pour wine, $3 well drinks and pints, $9.50 pitchers & appetizer special. Twenty-five varieties of wine for $25 dollars. 2645 Willamette St., Eugene.

Kiva Grocery: Wine Department focuses on affordable northwest wines, small European wines and organic wines. Ten percent off mixed case, 15 percent off unbroken cases. 125 W. 11th, Eugene.

Café Soriah: Wed. celebrate Wine Wednesdays. All day half off bottles of wine, including local notable names such as BrickHouse, Capitello, King Estate and Broadley. Bartenders have put together a special drink list for the holidays. 384 W. 13th Ave., Eugene.

Café Lucky Noodle: Tue. 5:30-7:30 pm Wine Night – all bottles 35 percent off, complimentary wine tasting in the lobby, excellent wine list. 207 East 5th Ave., Eugene.

Granary Wine Bar: Wed., all day $5 glass pours of house white or red. Find Patchwork Cellars delicious Pinot Noir here. 259 East 5th Ave., Eugene.

Cornucpia Maize Lounge: Daily happy hour 3-6 pm – “3/3/3  at 3” special. Three-dollar micros, wells and wine. 73 E. 13th Ave., Eugene.

June Restaurant and Bar: Tue. – Sat. 5 pm, New bar ‘Kate’s’ located inside June recently had its grand opening. Happy hour is Tue.- Fri., 5-6 pm. Their wine list has some great local wines. 1591 Willamette St., Eugene.

Wineries and Vineyards

Click here for the special Wine Down Eugene Thanksgiving Weekend Winery Open Houses

Save the Date or Reserve Now

Oakshire Brewing Co.: Nov. 30, 6:30 pm doors open for the 7:30 pm showing of “The Love of Beer,” a documentary celebrating women in the craft beer industry, followed by a Q/A with film maker Alison Grayson. Tickets available at Oakshire Brewing and 16 Tons. 1055 Madera St., Eugene.

Bier Stein: Dec. 1, 6-9 pm, Blue Dog Mead tasting. 345 E.11th Ave., Eugene

Saginaw Vineyard:
Dec. 2, 6-9 pm Friday Night Live in the Barn, featuring live music with Petri Dish. $10 cover charge includes wine tasting and simple hors d’oeuvres. 80247 Delight Valley Rd., Cottage Grove.

Silvan Ridge Winery:
Dec. 3, 6:30-9:30 pm, “Dead in the Sled” Murder Mystery Dinner. 27012 Briggs Hill Rd., Eugene.

Ambrosia Restaurant and Bar: Dec. 7, 5:30-7 pm, First Wednesday Wine Tasting, featuring all Italian wines. Twenty dollars per person includes a taste of ten wines and light appetizers. Read about these fabulous wine tastings here. 174 East Broadway Ave., Eugene.

Marché Provisions: Dec. 10, 8:15 pm, Wine Basics class – Champagne. Bubbles of all sorts, in-depth tasting notes and light appetizers. $35 per person. Call 541-743-0660 for reservations. 296 E. 5th Ave., Eugene.

Broadway Wine Merchants: Dec. 10, 5 pm to closing – 2011 Bubble Bash! Taste a wealth of delicious Champagne. Pricing will be at its best for holiday enjoyment and gifting. 17 Oakway Center, Eugene.

Sundance Wine Cellars: Dec. 10, 5-7 pm, wine tasting with Benton-Lane Winery. 2441 Hilyard St., Eugene.

LaVelle Vineyards in Elmira: Dec. 31 New Year’s Eve Murder Mystery Dinner and Dance. $99 includes three-course meal prepared by Field to Table Catering, a three-act play and round trip transportation from Valley River Center if you choose to use it. Seating is limited and advance ticket purchase is required. 89697 Sheffler Rd., Elmira.

Wine Down Eugene

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Eugene is truly home to a variety of venues that can easily appeal to all walks of life. Whether you’re an avid beer drinker, wine enthusiast or lover of all things food, you’re bound to find something this week that will entice you to head out the door and enjoy Eugene to its fullest.

Although I’ve got a busy week lined up, there’s no stopping me from taking advantage of some of the many fun events in the week ahead. On Friday afternoon, I’ll be heading over to the new Wineries without Walls wine shop and tasting room located in the Fern Ridge Chamber of Commerce in Veneta. Briggs Hill Winery will be hosting a wine tasting from 4-6 pm, and I’m looking forward to trying their Pinot Noir, one that I haven’t yet experienced.

On Saturday, I’m super excited to spend the afternoon at Oakshire Brewing for their release party of Hellshire Cat II – an Imperial Stout with coffee that was aged in bourbon barrels. Starting at noon, Oakshire will also be unveiling their newly remodeled tasting room, and celebrating with draft beers, food and live music.

Riding on the heels of the Oakshire event,  16 Tons Coffee Stout Fest begins at 4 pm. This event is taking place at their Union Cafe/Supreme Bean location on Willamette Street, and I can’t wait to sample some of their 20+ coffee infused brews; including, Stouts, Imperial Stouts and Porters. They’ll also be offering baked goods infused with beer and a Chocolate Stout Cake. It’s a good thing the beers will be infused with coffee because my event-packed Saturday won’t be ending at 16 Tons.

At 6:30 pm, Marché Restaurant is having a Wild Foods Dinner that I’m really looking forward to. Hank Shaw, author of “Hunt, Gather, Cook: Finding the Forgotten Feast, an exploration of North America’s edible flora and fauna”, will be hosting this dinner that will include wild foods of the Willamette Valley. Some of the enticing menu items are Roasted Chanterelle’s, Fennel Flower Tempura, Venison Carpaccio and Huckleberry Sorbet.

On Monday, which is my birthday and only two days before my husbands birthday, we’ll be celebrating at the beautiful King Estate Winery located in the breathtaking wine country that surrounds Eugene. With a valley view of the fall-colored vineyard, it’s the perfect place to take in the numerous bounties that we are incredibly blessed with. I’ll be sipping the King Estate 2009 Bradshaw Vineyard Designate Pinot Noir, which is one of my favorite local Pinot Noirs, and it will undoubtedly pair perfectly with King Estate’s Wild Oregon Mushroom Ragout, a savory dish combined with Yukon potato gnocchi, roasted tomatoes, leek vinaigrette, parmesan cheese and crispy artichoke hearts.

It’s a great week to take advantage of some of the many things to do in and around Eugene, so I hope to see you out and enjoying life, cheers!
[ad#King Estates – KE4]

Wine Bars & Wine Shops

Wineries without Walls (wine shop & tasting room): Fri. 4-6 pm wine tasting with Briggs Hill; Sat. 4-6 pm wine tasting featuring Patchwork Cellars. This new wine shop & tasting room showcases local wines, and it’s located inside the Fern Ridge Chamber of Commerce Visitor’s Center in Veneta. 24949 Hwy 126, Veneta.

Mac’s at the Vet’s Club: Wed. 6-9 pm. Wine, Jazz & Variety Show with Gus Russell & Paul Biondi. A different Oregon winery is featured each week.

Marché Restaurant: Sat. 6:30 pm. Wild Foods Dinner-a remarkable menu of wild foods of the Willamette Valley along with celebrated foraging expert and author of “Hunt, Gather, Cook: Finding the Forgotten Feast, an exploration of North America’s edible flora and fauna”, Hank Shaw. $65 per person, seating is limited. Call 541-683-2260 x 106.

Marché Provisions: Fri. 5-7 pm Free Friday Wine Tasting

16 Tons (Union Cafe/Supreme Bean location at 29th and Willamette): Sat. 4-10 pm. Coffee Stout Fest. Sample over 20 coffee infused beers. Free entry, tasters $1-$3; Tue. 1-10 pm. Deschutes Base Camp Eugene Kick Off Party, live music with Bulls on Parade, giveaways and 12 Deschutes beers on tap, mostly rare pub releases.

Authentica Wines: Tue-Fri 11 am – 6 pm and Sat. 10 am – 5 pm Wine Tasting available every Sat. at the Wine Bar and on the first Fri. of each month during the Art Walk. With a focus on artisan, small production wines for every budget, you’re bound to find something you love at this wine shop. 766 West Park St., Eugene.

‘s Wine (new wine shop in Pleasant Hill): Fri. 6-8 pm live music with woodwind quintet, Asculta. Extensive line of German wines and beer as well as a light menu.

Territorial Vineyards & Wine Co.: Thu. Open 5-11 pm – music starts around 7 pm Tim McLaughlin Presents (Tim and special guests jam); Fri. 5-11 pm – music starts around 7 pm with The Porch Band (Americana). November Art: original oils by Richard Quigley

Oakshire Brewing: Sat. Doors open at noon for the Hellshire II release & unveiling of newly remodeled tasting room. Live music and food available for purchase. Hellshire II is an Imperial Stout with coffee that was aged for seven months in bourbon barrels.

Bier Stein: Wed. 6 pm Ninkasi/21st Amendment Collaberation release of “Allies Win the War” and tap takeover including several other limited and specialty beers.

Café 440: Wed. All day. Wednesday Wine Flights for the month of November: California Rodney Strong red Wines and Oregon whites from Erath, Montinore and Stone Wolf. Three pours for $10.50.

B2 Wine Bar: Happy hour is M-F 4-6 pm and 9-10 pm; Thu. and Sat. Outdoor BBQ. Loads of northwest wines offered here.

Broadway Wine Merchants: Fri. 5-7 pm Free Friday Wine Tasting; Thu. 2010 Shea Vineyard release from Bergström  Wines, limited production due to 2010 late season, but excellent quality and easy to drink when young but can be stored for a decade or more.

LaVelle Club Room at 5th Street Market: Open during construction! Wed. 5-8 pm half off glass pours for ladies; Thurs. and Fri. 6-8 pm Live music.

Sam’s Place Tavern: Sat. watch Oregon and OSU games; Every booth has its own flat screen TV in addition to 22 plasma TV’s – Sports bar with a great wine list, 21 glass pours, all under $7! Wine list includes some excellent Oregon & northwest wines.

Red Agave: Excellent wine list including Oregon’s finest from King Estate, Territorial, Evesham Wood and Cristom to name just a few, It’s impressive.

Cork & Bottle Shoppe: Fri. 4 pm free wine or beer tasting weekly. The Cork & Bottle Shoppe is one of Oregon’s only liquor stores that carry a large selection of local and international wine and craft beer in addition to liquor. 812 Beltline Rd. Springfield.

Sundance Wine Cellars: Fri. 5-7 pm themed Frugal Friday wine tasting with Mario; Sat. 5-7 pm featuring local and regional wineries – wineries announced the day of on their Facebook page.

Jiffy Market: Fri. 5-7 pm Free wine tasting, house picks and pours; Sat. 6-10 pm. Purchase a whole sandwich from the deli and receive a Ninkasi pint for $2!

Café Zenon: Tues. 50 percent off bottles of wine; Mon-Fri. 5-6:30 pm $1 off glasses of wine and pints of beer. Find King Estate’s Domaine Pinot Gris and Capitello’s Sauvignon Blanc here – half off on Tuesdays!!

Izumi Sushi & Grill: Like sushi & wine? Izumi’s got great sushi and they offer local wine and beer from Hinman, King Estate, Ninkasi and Oakshire.

Sabai Café & Bar: Wines by the glass $6 and under. Excellent local wines from Territorial, King Estate, Capitello and Benton-Lane.

Agate Alley Laboratory: Sat. 10 pm Late Night at The Lab with $1 off glass pour wine, $3 well drinks and pints, $9.50 pitchers & appetizer special. 25 varieties of wine for $25 dollars.

Agate Alley Bistro: Mon. all day – six cheese fondue with all the fixings to dip, and their glass pour wines are half off for a bottle!

Capella Market: Fri. 4-6 pm Wine Tasting with Ex Cellars; Sat. 12-3 pm Beer Holiday Tasting Fair – samples of Thanksgiving menu items along with beer and wine tasting.

Kiva Grocery: Wine Department focuses on affordable northwest wines, small European wines and organic wines. 10 percent off mixed case, 15 percent off unbroken cases.

Café Soriah: Wed. Celebrate Wine Wednesdays! All day half off bottles of wine, including local notable names such as: BrickHouse, Capitello, King Estate, Broadley!

Café Lucky Noodle: Tue. 5:30-7:30 pm Wine Night – all bottles 35 percent off. Complimentary wine tasting in the lobby. Excellent wine list.

Granary Wine Bar: Wed. all day $5 glass pours of house white or red. Find Patchwork Cellars delicious Pinot Noir here.

Cornucpia Maize Lounge: Daily Happy Hour 3-6 pm – 3 3 3  at 3 special! $3 micros, wells, and wine.

[ad#King Estates – KA1]

Wineries & Vineyards

Abbelone Vineyards: Another fabulous winery without walls – check back frequently to find out where you can sample their delicious Pinot Noir.

Pfeiffer Vineyards: Open Mon.-Thu. 11 am – 5 pm and Fri./Sat. 11 am – 9 pm Watch the Ducks and Beavers on the big screen in the tasting room while sipping Pfeiffer wine by the fireplace.

Silvan Ridge Winery: Open daily 12-5 pm, Fri. 12-9 pm. Complimentary taste of five wines in addition to several limited wines that may be tasted for a fee.

Benton-Lane Winery: Open Daily 11 am – 5 pm Enjoy one of the Top 100 wines of the World: Benton-Lane 2010 Pinot Gris! Available in the tasting room by taste, glass or bottle.

King Estate: King Estate is open Daily 11 am-8 pm. Sample some of Oregon’s finest wine, dine on gourmet cuisine, and enjoy a valley view that’s unmatched.

Sarver Winery: Winter hours: Mon – Thu. by appointment, Fri.-Sun. 12-6 pm. Sample their different styles of Pinot Gris produced from their 25-year old estate vines along with full bodied reds like Cabernet, Syrah and Petite Sirah while taking in an unobstructed view of the Cascades.

Chateau Lorane: Open daily 12-5 pm. Stop by and taste some of their multiple award winners: Melon De Bourgogne, Petit Verdot, Viognier, Asian Girl Merlot, Zinfandel, Sauvignon Blanc and their double award-winning Red Bordeaux blend: Entourage, just to name a few.

J. Scott Cellars: New tasting room located in The Wine Place in Yachats! Be sure to stop by and taste his excellent small boutique handmade Rhone varietals from the Pacific Northwest. Specializing in Roussanne, Viognier, Petite Sirah, Syrah and Cabernet…and a little Pinot Noir!

Sweet Cheeks: Fri. 6-9 pm Twilight Tasting – sample pairings of Sweet Cheeks wine with Oregon-made artisan cheeses while listening to live music; Sun. 12-6 pm Mimosa Sundays – Fine sparkling wine and live music from 2-4 pm. Bring your own brunch!

Brigadoon Wine Co.: Fri.-Sun. 12-5 pm or by appointment. Call 541-998-8708. Try Brigadoon’s three excellent wines: a Pinot Blanc and two Pinot Noirs, which can now be enjoyed on their lovely deck with a view, or if it’s raining, you’ll be invited into their kitchen!

LaVelle Vineyards (winery in Elmira): Friday Night Flights is officially over for the winter season, but it will be back soon! Visit the winery daily, Mon. – Fri. 12-5 pm and Sat. – Sun. 12-6 pm.

Saginaw Vineyards: Open daily 11 am – 5pm. Sample their delicious traditional style wines in their tasting room located in the original building of a 1905 farmstead. They also specialize in farm-fresh fruit wines! 80247 Delight Valley School Rd, Cottage Grove. Just 15 minutes south of Eugene at Exit 176 off the I-5. Call 541-942-1364 for more information.

Stanton Vineyards: Another local “winery without walls”, so keep an eye out for events where Charlie Stanton will be pouring his delicious wines. Bottles sold at Sundance, Market of Choice & Authentica and in restaurants Marché and Eugene Country Club.

Noble Estate: The winery is open 7 days a week 12-5 pm.Tasting room with beautiful new patio and gorgeous view.

Briggs Hill Winery: Fri. 4-6 pm tasting at the Wineries without Walls wine shop and tasting bar inside the Fern Ridge Chamber of Commerce.

Iris Vineyards: Mon.-Fri. 11 am – 3 pm. Stop by their state of the art winery and tasting room in Cottage Grove. $3 tasting fee includes free wine glass and cheese and crackers. 541-942-5993

Patchwork Cellars: Sat. 4-6 pm tasting at the Wineries without Walls wine shop and tasting bar located inside the Fern Ridge Chamber of commerce.

Capitello Wines: Another local winery without walls, so keep an eye out on Capitello’s Facebook page for upcoming events and tastings.

[ad#King Estates – KA2]

Save the Date or Reserve Now

Marché Restaurant: Nov. 17 French Regional Dinner featuring Beaujolais & Lyon. For reservations, call 541-342-3612 x2

Wineries without Walls (wine shop & tasting room): Nov. 18-19 Holiday Bazaar at the Fern Ridge Chamber of Commerce with extended wine tasting hours; Fri. 3-6 pm Lone Oak Vineyard; Sat. 2-6 pm J. Scott Cellars & Noble Estate. This wine shop and tasting room showcases local wines and is located inside the Fern Ridge Chamber of Commerce Visitor’s Center in Veneta.

Silvan Ridge Winery: Dec. 3, 6:30-9:30 pm “Dead in the Sled” Murder Mystery Dinner.

Broadway Wine Merchants: Dec. 10, 5 pm to closing – 2011 Bubble Bash! Taste a wealth of delicious Champagne. Pricing will be at its best for Holiday enjoyment and gifting.

Wine Down Eugene

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ENTER TO WIN TWO VIP TICKETS to the NW FOOD AND WINE FESTIVAL!

This premier event will take place at the Double Tree Lloyd Center in Portland on Nov. 5 from 4-8 pm ($190 value). TWO VIP tickets include an early admission to the Preferred & Grand Tasting Event from 4-5 pm. There will be over 600 wines and 50 restaurants offering samples along with Certified Sommelier’s and Chefs available for questions regarding wine and food.

Two ways to be entered to win:
1. Like or share this weeks Wine Down Eugene on Facebook.
2. Comment on this weeks Wine Down Eugene on eugenedailynews.com.

This is a 21 and over only event. A valid ID will be necessary to obtain the winning tickets. Winner will be announced in the Nov. 2 Wine Down Eugene. Winning tickets will be on Will Call at the event.

Good luck, and I hope to see you at the Northwest Food & Wine Festival, cheers! – Julia

Wine Down for October 26 – November 1

Wine Bars & Wine Shops

[ad#King Estates – KE4]

Wineries without Walls (wine shop & tasting room): Fri. 4-6 pm wine tasting with Lone Oak Vineyard; Sat. 4-6 pm wine tasting featuring Benton-Lane Winery. This new wine shop & tasting room showcases local wines, and it’s located inside the Fern Ridge Chamber of Commerce Visitor’s Center in Veneta. 24949 Hwy 126, Veneta.

Mac’s at the Vet’s Club: Wed. 6-9 pm. Wine, Jazz & Variety Show with Gus Russell & Paul Biondi. A different Oregon winery is featured each week; Sat. 7 pm – 2 am Mac’s Halloween Bash- costume contest, prizes and drink specials, live music with Door Number Three at 7 pm and Michael Tracey at 9:30 pm.

Marché Provisions: Fri. 5-7 pm Free Friday Wine Tasting

16 Tons (Union Cafe/Supreme Bean location at 29th and Willamette): Thu. 4 pm Ninkasi Total Tap Takeover! Fresh Hopped, Oak Aged, Cask and other unusually fun brews will be featured. Pint & Growler specials too.

Authentica Wines: Tue-Fri 11 am – 6 pm and Sat. 10 am – 5 pm Wine Tasting available every Sat. at the Wine Bar and on the first Fri. of each month during the Art Walk. With a focus on artisan, small production wines for every budget, you’re bound to find something you love at this wine shop. 766 West Park St., Eugene.

Territorial Vineyards & Wine Co.: Thu. Open 5-11 pm – music starts around 7 pm with Jesse Meade (solo acoustic); Fri. 5-11 pm – music starts around 7 pm with Manouche Noir (gypsy jazz). October Art: original oils by Lorraine Bushek-Autumn Tour. 907 W. 3rd,Eugene

Bier Stein: Thu. 5-8 pm Tasting of  Logsdon Organic Farmhouse Ales. Farmhouse-style ales from a real farm just outside of Hood River.

Osteria Sfizio: Sun. 5-9 pm Regional Italian Dinner featuring Arbruzzo. The Arbruzzo region of Italy is known for strong flavors and strong hospitality. For reservations, call 541-302-3000.

Café 440: Wed. all day-October Wednesday Wine Flights. In honor of Breast Health Awareness this month, they’re proudly featuring red and white wines from Cline Cellars in Sonoma County. Cline Cellars has donated over $200,000 to Breast Cancer Foundations. $1 from each bottle of Cashmere sold goes to Breast Cancer Research. Three pours of Cline Cellars for $10.50.

B2 Wine Bar: Happy hour is M-F 4-6 pm and 9-1 0pm; Thu. and Sat. Outdoor BBQ. Loads of northwest wines offered here.

Broadway Wine Merchants: Fri. 5-7 pm Free Friday Wine Tasting. Angus recently brought in as much of Evesham’s 2010 WV Pinot Noir ($19 each and Evesham’s 2009 Le Puits Sec Pinot Noir just 500 cases produced, only 8 left ($36 ea) Special case discounts available.

LaVelle Club Room at 5th Street Market: Open during construction! Wed. 5-8 pm half off glass pours for ladies; Thurs. and Fri. 6-8 pm Live music.

Sam’s Place Tavern: Wed. 6 pm Cigar Night – Cigars on 7th brings in a selection of cigars and knowledge every last Wed. of the month; Fri. 8-11 pm live music with Blind Lemon Pancake; Sat. Oregon vs WSU at noon and OSU vs Utah at 4 pm; Every booth has its own flat screen TV in addition to 22 plasma TV’s – Sports bar with a great wine list, 21 glass pours, all under $7! Wine list includes some excellent Oregon & northwest wines.

Red Agave: Excellent wine list including Oregon’s finest from King Estate, Territorial, Evesham Wood and Cristom to name just a few, It’s impressive.

Cork & Bottle Shoppe: Fri. 4 pm free wine or beer tasting weekly. The Cork & Bottle Shoppe is one of Oregon’s only liquor stores that carry a large selection of local and international wine and craft beer in addition to liquor. 812 Beltline Rd. Springfield.

Sundance Wine Cellars: Fri. 5-7 pm themed Frugal Friday wine tasting with Mario; Sat. 5-7 pm featuring local and regional wineries – wineries announced the day of on their Facebook page. Last Sat. they featured premier wines from Bergstrom.

Jiffy Market: Fri. 5-7 pm Free wine tasting, house picks and pours; Sat. 6-10 pm. Purchase a whole sandwich from the deli and receive a Ninkasi pint for $2!

Café Zenon: Tues. 50 percent off bottles of wine; Mon-Fri. 5-6:30 pm $1 off glasses of wine and pints of beer. Find King Estate’s Domaine Pinot Gris and Capitello’s Sauvignon Blanc here – half off on Tuesdays!!

Izumi Sushi & Grill: Like sushi & wine? Izumi’s got great sushi and they offer local wine and beer from Hinman, King Estate, Ninkasi and Oakshire.

Sabai Café & Bar: Wines by the glass $6 and under. Excellent local wines from Territorial, King Estate, Capitello and Benton-Lane.

Agate Alley Laboratory: Sat. 10 pm Late Night at The Lab with $1 off glass pour wine, $3 well drinks and pints, $9.50 pitchers & appetizer special. 25 varieties of wine for $25 dollars! New menu was released last Thurs. and their wine list is one not to miss.

Agate Alley Bistro: Mon. all day – six cheese fondue with all the fixings to dip, and their glass pour wines are half off for a bottle!

Capella Market: Fri. 4-6 pm Beer Tasting with New Belgium Brewing (Fort Collins, CO); Sat. 4-6 pm Wine tasting with Mitchell Wines.

Kiva Grocery: Wine Department focuses on affordable northwest wines, small European wines and organic wines. 10 percent off mixed case, 15 percent off unbroken cases.

Café Soriah: Wed. Celebrate Wine Wednesdays! All day half off bottles of wine, including local notable names such as: BrickHouse, Capitello, King Estate, Broadley!

Café Lucky Noodle: Tue. 5:30-7:30 pm Wine Night – all bottles 35 percent off. Complimentary wine tasting in the lobby. Excellent wine list.

Granary Wine Bar: Wed. all day $5 glass pours of house white or red. Find Patchwork Cellars delicious Pinot Noir here.

Cornucpia Maize Lounge: Daily Happy Hour 3-6p – 3 3 3  at 3 special! $3 micros, wells, and wine.

Wineries & Vineyards

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Abbelone Vineyards: Wed. all day starting first thing in the morning – Spooky Harvest Party. Help the Ferry family celebrate harvest and bring in their bountiful Pinot Noir! They will supply the clippers and bins along with food starting at noon, wine, music and friends. Kids are invited too, in costumes too! 85505 Christensen Rd. (across from Cascade Raptor Center) off of Fox Hollow.

Pfeiffer Vineyards: Open Mon.-Thu. 11 am – 5pm and Fri./Sat. 11am – 9pm! Watch the Ducks and Beavers on the big screen in the tasting room while sipping Pfeiffer wine by the fireplace!

Silvan Ridge Winery: Open daily 12-5 pm, Fri. 12-9 pm. Complimentary taste of five wines in addition to several limited wines that may be tasted for a fee.

Benton-Lane Winery: Open Daily 11 am – 5 pm Enjoy one of the Top 100 wines of the World: the 2010 Pinot Gris! Rates are available in the tasting room by taste, glass or bottle.

King Estate: King Estate is open Daily 11 am-8 pm. Sample some of Oregon’s finest wine, dine on gourmet cuisine, and enjoy a valley view that’s unmatched. Their Acrobat Pinot Gris was recently Wine Spectator’s Wine of the Week!

Sarver Winery: Open Mon.-Thu. 12-5 pm and Fri.-Sun. 12-8 pm. Sample their different styles of Pinot Gris produced from their 25-year old estate vines along with full bodied reds like Cabernet, Syrah and Petite Sirah while taking in an unobstructed view of the Cascades.

Chateau Lorane: Open daily 12-5 pm.  Stop by and taste some of their multiple award winners: Melon De Bourgogne, Petit Verdot, Viognier, Asian Girl Merlot, Zinfandel, Sauvignon Blanc and their double award-winning Red Bordeaux blend: Entourage, just to name a few.

J. Scott Cellars: New tasting room located in The Wine Place in Yachats! Be sure to stop by and taste his excellent small boutique handmade Rhone varietals from the Pacific Northwest. Specializing in Roussanne, Viognier, Petite Sirah, Syrah and Cabernet…and a little Pinot Noir!

Brigadoon Wine Co.: Fri.-Sun. 12-5 pm or by appointment. Call 541-998-8708. Try Brigadoon’s three excellent wines: a Pinot Blanc and two Pinot Noirs, which can now be enjoyed on their lovely deck with a view, or if it’s raining, you’ll be invited into their kitchen!

LaVelle Vineyards (winery in Elmira): Fri. 5-9 pm Friday Night Flights with free flight tastings, Devour Gourmet Food Cart and live music.

Saginaw Vineyards: Open daily 11 am – 5pm. Sample their delicious traditional style wines in their tasting room located in the original building of a 1905 farmstead. They also specialize in farm-fresh fruit wines! 80247 Delight Valley School Rd, Cottage Grove. Just 15 minutes south of Eugene at Exit 176 off the I-5. Call 541-942-1364 for more information.

Stanton Vineyards: Another local “winery without walls”, so keep an eye out for events where Charlie Stanton will be pouring his delicious wines. Bottles sold at Sundance, Market of Choice & Authentica and in restaurants Marché and Eugene Country Club.

Noble Estate: The winery is open 7 days a week 12-5 pm.Tasting room with beautiful new patio and gorgeous view.

Iris Vineyards: Mon.-Fri. 11 am – 3 pm. Stop by their state of the art winery and tasting room in Cottage Grove. $3 tasting fee includes free wine glass and cheese and crackers. 541-942-5993

Capitello Wines: Another local winery without walls, so keep an eye out on Capitello’s Facebook page for upcoming events and tastings.

Save the Date or Reserve Now

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Ambrosia: Nov. 2, 5:30-7 pm. First Wednesday Wine Tasting taking place in Ambrosia’s cellar. 10 Big & Bold red wines from Oregon’s Zerba Cellars (fruit from Walla Walla)! $20 per person with a $5 credit towards wine purchase.

Eugene Cascades & Coast Adventure Center: Nov. 8, 4-6:30 pm. Vertical Pinot Noir tasting with Noble Estate and 20 percent off wine purchases.

Oakshire Brewing: Nov. 12 Doors open at noon for the Hellshire II release & unveiling of newly remodeled tasting room. Live music and food available for purchase. Hellshire II is an Imperial Stout that was aged for seven months in bourbon barrels and will be sold at a special price during the event.

Marché Restaurant: Nov. 17 French Regional Dinner featuring Beaujolais & Lyon. For reservations, call 541-342-3612 x2

Wineries without Walls (wine shop & tasting room): Nov. 18-19 Holiday Bazaar at the Fern Ridge Chamber of Commerce with extended wine tasting hours; Fri. 3-6 pm Lone Oak Vineyard; Sat. 2-6 pm J. Scott Cellars & Noble Estate This wine shop and tasting room showcases local wines and is located inside the Fern Ridge Chamber of Commerce Visitor’s Center in Veneta.