Casey Martin

Oregon men’s golf breaks through at Ka’anapali and takes No. 1 rank

If going undefeated wasn’t good enough, breaking an NCAA record pushed the Oregon men’s golf team over the top.

Oregon’s dominant performance at the blustery Ka’anapali Golf Course proved that the men’s golf team was ready to make the jump to No. 1 in the Golf Coaches Association of America Coaches poll, marking the highest ranking in program history.

Oregon shot a ridiculous 30-under in the opening, setting a new NCAA record, as confirmed by Golfweek and Golfstat, for the lowest single round score.

Freshman Aaron Wise shot 5-under-par 66 in the opening round, a score that would normally put him at the top of the leaderboard, but was dropped from the record round.

“In the team meeting after the round, I kind of jokingly called him out,” head coach Casey Martin said. “’Look Aaron, you’re not helping the team, it’s a real disappointment.’”

Joke or not, Wise challenged himself to make the cut.

In the third round, Wise shot a team best 6-under-par 65, putting him in prime position to win the event outright. With one hole to go, North Florida’s M.J. Maguire sank a birdie putt to tie the score with Wise and force a playoff.

It took just one hole to decide it as Wise nailed a birdie putt to win his first collegiate event, marking the second time this season a freshman has come through in the clutch for the Ducks.

“A lot of that comes from the way we practice with the team,” Wise said. “We have a lot of competitions and the rounds we play always come down to the last few holes, we have to make a few putts and we feel like when we’re in those situations in tournaments, we’re used to it. We’re able to draw on the experience we get from our practices and perform the shot properly.”

Oregon is 4-0 for the first time in program history, owns the best record in all of college golf and now holds the NCAA record for the best round in history. However, those accomplishments won’t mean much if Oregon can’t perform well in the postseason. But right now, Martin isn’t worried about things so far down the line.

“We don’t talk about that,” Martin said. “They know where they’re ranked and what that means, but for these guys, if all five of them can just keep chipping away and get better, then look out.”

If Oregon does find itself making the cut at the NCAAs later this season, it will be because of a strong mixture of experienced upperclassmen and talented freshmen carrying their own weight the whole way.

“There’s no one guy on our team that sticks out as someone who is overly cocky or arrogant or anything like that,” junior Brandon McIver said. “Everyone comes to practice with a mentality to get better. Be humble, take what you get and if you work hard we know everything else will take care of itself.”

The Ducks will take a month off before heading back into the tournament circuit in February. When they do tee off, it will be into uncharted territory as the nation’s top team.

Follow Josh Schlichter on Twitter @joshschlichter

No. 2 Oregon men’s golf climbs the polls after hot start

Oregon men’s golf is now ranked in the top five of all three national polls after its best start since 2011.

The Ducks received five first-place votes in last week’s Golf Coaches Association of America Coaches Poll, climbing 11 spots from their previous ranking to No. 3. Golfstat’s rankings have Oregon at No. 2, while the Ducks are No. 5 in the Golfweek’s Sagarin ratings.

Oregon is one of just two teams that have won three tournaments this fall. Top ranked University of Illinois is the only other program that has accomplished that feat, but Illinois has already played in four tournaments while Oregon has maintained a perfect record through its first three outings.

Two of the teams Oregon topped in wins, UCLA and USC, have two tournament wins of their own, noticeably boosting Oregon’s strength of schedule. Golfweek ranked Oregon’s schedule at No. 19, while Golfstat placed Oregon’s comparative record at No. 3, overall.

“They really want to compete against the elite level teams,” head coach Casey Martin said. “We’re grateful that we are off to a good start.”

It’s just the second time in program history that Oregon has won three fall tournaments, marking a significant change of pace for the younger Ducks.

“It’s different from my first years when we kind of struggled as a team for a majority of our tournaments,” junior Brandon McIver said. “It’s nice to come out confident that we can do really well and prove to everyone that we have the potential and the talent along with the coaching staff to take this season and make the most of it.”

McIver is just one part of a now-experienced group of Oregon golfers that have not only carried the team up the leaderboards, but to victories over quality opponents.

Sophomore Thomas Lim leads the team with a 70.11 stroke average, while junior Zach Foushee is second with a 71.89 average and freshman Hurly Long comes in third at 72.11. McIver is tied with freshman Aaron Wise for fourth on the team with a 72.22 average.

Lim’s performance has attracted plenty of national attention. Golfweek ranked Lim No. 20 in the individual collegiate poll, making him the Pac-12′s third best golfer.

“I really want to start competing with teams like Texas and Oklahoma State and Alabama because those schools in their conferences are always powerhouses,” Lim said. “That’s where we need to be to have a chance at a national championship.”

With only three events under their belts, there is a lot of time for the Ducks to climb even higher in the polls, or fall out of relevance.

The Ducks will look to solidify their spot in the rankings as they head to Hawaii this week for the first annual Ka’anapali Classic Nov. 7-9 for the final event before their midseason break. The tournament will pit them against multiple competitive west coast programs as well as No. 25 Clemson.

Pac-12 play will ramp up in February when Oregon heads to California and Arizona before returning home for the Duck Invitational at the Eugene Country Club March 23-24.

Follow Josh Schlichter on Twitter @joshschlichter

Oregon men’s golf’s Hurly Long is ready for the next big stage

If Tiger Woods started at age 2, then Hurly Long might have a leg up on him. Long is the newest international addition to the Oregon men’s golf team and has been swinging the clubs since he was just 18 months old.

Raised in St. Leon-Rot, Germany, Long has been a star in Europe since he was just a child. At age seven, Long participated in the USKIDS World Championships, which ended up being Long’s big break.

“It made me want more,” Long, a freshman, said. “It motivated me to push harder and do more. It was always my dream to be on tour and be the next Tiger Woods and it was the first moment I realized that I really, really wanted it and I was going to give everything for it.”

Just a few years later, Long was named to the German Junior National Team and played in the prestigious British Boys tournament. Despite his growing reputation in Europe, Long didn’t consider staying in Europe as an option.

“I’ve been planning to go to college for about 15 years now,” Long said. “It was always what I wanted to do. I decided that early because it gives you a ‘Plan B’ if golf doesn’t work out. You have every opportunity in the world to get better here and at the same time, you can get educated and get a good degree.”

To get to the U.S., Long had to be noticed by American coaches. His father, Ted, who is known as the best golf coach in Germany, was instrumental in getting Long’s name circulating in the states. Eventually his father reached out to Oregon head coach Casey Martin, who flew out to watch Long win the Doral Publix Junior title at the Trump National Doral Golf Club in Miami, Florida. The rest is history.

“It was either going to be a coach like most coaches that manage the team with tee times, which is fine – they’re nice guys, good motivators, but maybe not quite so knowledgeable about the game – or Coach Martin,” Long said. “I knew I wasn’t going to get a better coach.”

After a golf filled summer that took Long from tournaments in Germany to Japan and then to Oregon in just a few days, Long has made a noticeable impact on the team, something that very few freshmen have done at Oregon. Last month, Long sunk a critical birdie in the first playoff round against Pac-12 rival USC to win the Itani Homes Collegiate in Pullman, Washington.

“He appears to show signs of being pretty clutch,” Martin said. “He’s been a huge addition, no doubt about it.”

Along with fellow freshman Aaron Wise, a three-time U.S. Amateur qualifier, Long is part of a uniquely experienced recruiting class.

“We don’t really view them as freshmen,” junior golfer Brandon McIver said. “They’re both really mature in their golf game. They’re meshing well with everyone else and their play has been a huge part of our success so far this season.”

Long might have a ways to go before he can catch up to Tiger, but he’s on the right track.

Oregon’s Brandon McIver to play in US Open at Pinehurst

After shooting a bogey,double-bogey on the 14th and 15th holes on the final day of the US Open sectional qualifying at the Emerald Valley Golf Course in Eugene, Brandon McIver’s hopes of playing in the US Open at Pinehurst, N.C. seemed to be dashed. He finished just one stroke shy of an automatic bid at the tournament’s end and was the first alternate coming out of Eugene and the third alternate overall.

However, McIver’s luck quickly changed after receiving a phone call Sunday from the United States Golf Association, notifying him that he would be playing at the Pinehurst Resort and Country Club for the 114th installation of the US Open. T

“I was just ecstatic,” McIver told Goducks.com. 

The Billings, Mont. native will become the first active Oregon golfer under Casey Martin to play in the US Open and is also the first, current or former Duck, to play in the open since Ben Crane did it in 2012.

The junior earned this opportunity after only one player from the PGA Tour and European Tour received an exemption to play at the tournament by virtue of the latest world rankings. He will be in good company as well, with Stanford’s Cameron Wilson, the 2014 NCAA Men’s Golf Medalist, joining him.

Not only that, McIver is paired with Maverick McNealy of Stanford and Smylie Kaufman, a recent graduate of LSU who was at the NCAA Championships with both McIver and Nealy. The group is scheduled to tee off on Thursday, June 12, at 5:46 a.m. (PDT).

Van Williams, a native of North Carolina and a first year assistant as Oregon’s golf coach, will be in Pinehurst with the McIver along with Jake Hedge, who will serve as his caddie.

Evidently so, McIver will be in a different realm than he is used to as the this week’s practice rounds begin. Playing in one of the major tournaments on the PGA Tour, McIver, along with 11 other amateurs, will be in a field full of the best golfers in the world.

“We’re just thrilled and excited for Brandon,” head coach Casey Martin said to Goducks.com. “It’s an incredible opportunity, a once in a lifetime opportunity. Regardless of how he does, he’ll become a better golfer having competed in the U.S. Open.”

Follow Justin Wise on Twitter @JWISE25

Oregon golfer Brandon McIver gets major advantage at U.S. Open qualifier

Because so much of the game of golf is about routine, every little detail counts. From the way a golfer starts his or her morning to the way he or she sets his or her stance in the tee box, even the slightest variable could have an impact on his or her performance. This routine is amplified when the golfer is unfamiliar with the golf course.

Sophomore golfer Brandon McIver will have many of those variables taken out of the equation when he takes to the course for the U.S. Open Sectional Qualifier on Monday at the local Emerald Valley Golf Club. The familiar turf will give him a major leg up on the rest of the field — Emerald Valley is Oregon’s practice facility.

When McIver shot a four-under 68 to finish in a tie for second in the local qualifying round last month, he knew what would come next.

“I was just happy that I was able to make it to the second round,” McIver said. “Because I knew it was at Emerald Valley where we play so often.”

Those looking for evidence of the effects of home-course advantage don’t need to look further than Oregon’s performance at the NCAA West Regional held at the Eugene Country Club last month. The Ducks were the surprise of the tournament as they finished second, just one stroke behind No. 2 Stanford. McIver shot a five-over 215 to finish in a tie for eighth overall at the event.

“Seeing that I get to sleep in my own bed and go through my own routine without having to overcome any variables are huge advantages,” McIver said.

Back in 2012, Oregon head coach Casey Martin qualified for the Open at the same course and cited home-cooking as a big part of his success.

“A couple of years ago I hadn’t really been playing much and I had a wing-it kind of feeling,” Martin said. “There wasn’t a lot of pressure and fortunately I played really well. The advantage I had, and Brandon has as well, is that we’re playing a golf course we know really well.”

McIver learned to play alongside his grandfather.

“His normal foursome on a Saturday morning was three World War II veterans and a 10 year-old boy,” Bob McIver, Brandon’s father said. “I think that’s how he learned how to respect the game, and every four-letter word you don’t want a 10 year-old kid to know.”

When McIver takes the course Monday he’ll be golfing, once again, with veterans of the game of golf as the field features both amateurs and professionals alike. Despite the challenging competition, Martin thinks McIver has more than an outside shot at advancing.

“He hit the ball beautifully back at the national championship and if he hits it like that on a golf course that he knows like the back of his hand, I wouldn’t put it past him to qualify,” Martin said. “It’s going to be difficult, but he can do it.”

Follow Josh Schlichter on Twitter @joshschlichter

Oregon men’s golfer Ryann Ree to transfer

Sophomore golfer Ryann Ree has decided to transfer from the University of Oregon, an Oregon men’s golf spokesman confirmed in an email to the Emerald Wednesday.

Ree was present at the NCAA West Regional at the Eugene Country Club but did not compete in the event. Ree last played for the team in the Pac-12 championships where he scored 28-over in three rounds.

“I think he wasn’t real happy here and wanted to be closer to home,” head coach Casey Martin said. “We wish him the best and hope he finds a place where he can excel at golf.”

Ree declined to comment.

The Redondo Beach, California native averaged 73.45 strokes per round, 1.84 against par and competed in 10 tournaments this season for the Ducks.

Ree is slated to participate alongside his former teammate Brandon McIver in the U.S. Open Sectional Qualifier June 2 at the Emerald Valley Golf Club in Creswell, Oregon.

Follow Josh Schlichter on Twitter @joshschlichter

Oregon men’s golf finishes one-stroke behind winner Stanford, advances to NCAA Championships

Zach Foushee brushed aside struggles with his swing all season. Thomas Lim shot a 66, four-under Saturday despite having strep throat. Jonathan Woo responded with an even par the day after he scored an eight-over, and Brandon McIver remained consistent throughout, resulting in a second place finish for Oregon men’s golf at the NCAA West Regional.

Placing just one stroke behind third ranked Stanford, Oregon men’s golf -evident benefactors of playing at the Eugene Country Club – moved from fifth to second over the course of the three-day event and advanced to the NCAA Championships, which will be held in Hutchinson, Kan. from May 23-27.

Leveling off on the final day of competition has been somewhat of a theme for the group throughout 2014, however Saturday proved to be different and the Ducks roared back from an 11-shot deficit to come within just one stroke of Stanford. Thru holes 16-18, Oregon was in striking distance, but a few unlucky breaks on the putting green allowed Stanford to hold on. Overall, Oregon’s final scorecard was 276-280-285-860 (+14) and the team had three players finish in the top-ten individually.

“Everybody was big, it was a big week for us,” head coach Casey Martin said. “Hopefully its showing that we’re learning and maturing. The kids have some talent so its good to see.”

Foushee became the headed storyline of the tournament after being 1-under par after the first two days, prompting him to be in the marquee group Saturday that featured the number one amateur player in the world, Patrick Rodgers.Rodgers would go onto win the event individually, but for Oregon, Foushee’s 215(+5), a tie for eighth individually, was in his eyes the best golf he’s played all year.

“The beginning of the year I was going through some struggles with my swing and was thinking too much about the mechanics,” Foushee said following his 76 (+6) in the third round.”I just forgot about it and played the game I love to play.”

Dismissing the thought process, Foushee routinely shot off the tee without practicing his swing Saturday.

“That’s kind of my routine,” the sophomore said. “My dad always taught me shooting free throws doesn’t take a lot of time, don’t think about it, so I brought it over to golf.”

McIver also finished in a tie for eighth, while Thomas Lim finished second individually after his performance Saturday improved his overall score to even-par.

With three players finishing in the top ten, it was no mystery as the rounds continued that the breadth of familiarity the Ducks had with this course was unmatched.

“I think it played a really good factor,” McIver said. “I mean especially off the tee hitting some of those lines. Some of those teams aren’t used to the way the hill look with the big trees, narrow fairways. I think just off the tee was an advantage and the greens with how fast they are and knowing where certain pins were and slopes around them and how severe they were.”

Woo finished with a 220 (+10) on the tournament, but his 70 (E) played a huge role in the Ducks’ late surge on Saturday. Sulman Raza battled with some inconsistencies throughout the day and tournament, placing 39th individually with a score of 224 (+14).

With a birth into the NCAA Championships, the Ducks now head to Hutchinson Kan. with an exceeded level of confidence and the mindset to create some damage.

“We want to go compete and try to win, that’s what we’re going to do,” Martin said.”Obviously we’re not the favorite, but stranger things have happened, who won basketball this year what seed were they. Stranger things have happened and we’re going to go out there and go battle.”

Follow Justin Wise on Twitter @JWISE25

Photos: Oregon men’s golf finish day one of NCAA West Regionals fifth in team standings

The Oregon men’s golf team opens up day one of the NCAA West Regionals on Thursday, May 15, 2014 at the Eugene Country Club. The Ducks will host 12, top-ranked competitors which include: No. 3 Stanford, No. 10 Houston, No. 15 Oklahoma, No. 22 South Carolina, No. 27 Baylor, No. 34 Liberty, No. 47 Tennessee, No. 51 North Florida, No. 58 East Tennessee State, No. 64 Chattanooga, No. 116 Wichita State and No. 151 Northern Colorado. Oregon, seventh-seed in the West Regional, looks to make a return to the NCAA Tournament after failing to make an appearance in 2013.

Next for the Ducks is day two of the NCAA West Regional hosted at the Eugene Country Club on Friday, May 16, 2014.

Oregon sophomore Brandon McIver hits a chip shot out of the bunker on the 6th hole. The Oregon men's golf team opens up day one of the NCAA West Regionals on Thursday, May 15, 2014 at the Eugene Country Club. (Andrew Seng/Emerald)

Oregon sophomore Brandon McIver hits a chip shot out of the bunker on the 6th hole. The Oregon men’s golf team opens up day one of the NCAA West Regionals on Thursday, May 15, 2014 at the Eugene Country Club. (Andrew Seng/Emerald)

Tennessee freshman Jack Smith tees off the third tee box. The Oregon men's golf team opens up day one of the NCAA West Regionals on Thursday, May 15, 2014 at the Eugene Country Club. (Andrew Seng/Emerald)

Tennessee freshman Jack Smith tees off the third tee box. The Oregon men’s golf team opens up day one of the NCAA West Regionals on Thursday, May 15, 2014 at the Eugene Country Club. (Andrew Seng/Emerald)

Oregon freshman Thomas Lim takes a stroke under penalty of one stroke after his golf ball lands in the water hazard near the 6th hole. The Oregon men's golf team opens up day one of the NCAA West Regionals on Thursday, May 15, 2014 at the Eugene Country Club. (Andrew Seng/Emerald)

Oregon freshman Thomas Lim takes a stroke under penalty of one stroke after his golf ball lands in the water hazard near the 6th hole. The Oregon men’s golf team opens up day one of the NCAA West Regionals on Thursday, May 15, 2014 at the Eugene Country Club. (Andrew Seng/Emerald)

Tennessee freshman Jack Smith hits a putt shot on the 6th green. The Oregon men's golf team opens up day one of the NCAA West Regionals on Thursday, May 15, 2014 at the Eugene Country Club. (Andrew Seng/Emerald)

Tennessee freshman Jack Smith hits a putt shot on the 6th green. The Oregon men’s golf team opens up day one of the NCAA West Regionals on Thursday, May 15, 2014 at the Eugene Country Club. (Andrew Seng/Emerald)

Tennessee senior Danny Keddie tees off the 6th hole. The Oregon men's golf team opens up day one of the NCAA West Regionals on Thursday, May 15, 2014 at the Eugene Country Club. (Andrew Seng/Emerald)

Tennessee senior Danny Keddie tees off the 6th hole. The Oregon men’s golf team opens up day one of the NCAA West Regionals on Thursday, May 15, 2014 at the Eugene Country Club. (Andrew Seng/Emerald)

The Oregon men's golf team opens up day one of the NCAA West Regionals on Thursday, May 15, 2014 at the Eugene Country Club. (Andrew Seng/Emerald)

The Oregon men’s golf team opens up day one of the NCAA West Regionals on Thursday, May 15, 2014 at the Eugene Country Club. (Andrew Seng/Emerald)

Oregon sophomore Sulman Raza smirks after hitting a putt shot in the 6th green. The Oregon men's golf team opens up day one of the NCAA West Regionals on Thursday, May 15, 2014 at the Eugene Country Club. (Andrew Seng/Emerald)

Oregon sophomore Sulman Raza smirks after hitting a putt shot in the 6th green. The Oregon men’s golf team opens up day one of the NCAA West Regionals on Thursday, May 15, 2014 at the Eugene Country Club. (Andrew Seng/Emerald)

Tennesse sophomore Michael Nagy hits a chip shot out of a bunker on the 6th hole. The Oregon men's golf team opens up day one of the NCAA West Regionals on Thursday, May 15, 2014 at the Eugene Country Club. (Andrew Seng/Emerald)

Tennesse sophomore Michael Nagy hits a chip shot out of a bunker on the 6th hole. The Oregon men’s golf team opens up day one of the NCAA West Regionals on Thursday, May 15, 2014 at the Eugene Country Club. (Andrew Seng/Emerald)

Oregon sophomore Brandon McIver tees off the 6th hole. The Oregon men's golf team opens up day one of the NCAA West Regionals on Thursday, May 15, 2014 at the Eugene Country Club. (Andrew Seng/Emerald)

Oregon sophomore Brandon McIver tees off the 6th hole. The Oregon men’s golf team opens up day one of the NCAA West Regionals on Thursday, May 15, 2014 at the Eugene Country Club. (Andrew Seng/Emerald)

Oregon sophomore Zach Foushee walks down the third fairway. The Oregon men's golf team opens up day one of the NCAA West Regionals on Thursday, May 15, 2014 at the Eugene Country Club. (Andrew Seng/Emerald)

Oregon sophomore Zach Foushee walks down the third fairway. The Oregon men’s golf team opens up day one of the NCAA West Regionals on Thursday, May 15, 2014 at the Eugene Country Club. (Andrew Seng/Emerald)

Tennesse sophomore Michael Nagy tees off the third tee box. The Oregon men's golf team opens up day one of the NCAA West Regionals on Thursday, May 15, 2014 at the Eugene Country Club. (Andrew Seng/Emerald)

Tennesse sophomore Michael Nagy tees off the third tee box. The Oregon men’s golf team opens up day one of the NCAA West Regionals on Thursday, May 15, 2014 at the Eugene Country Club. (Andrew Seng/Emerald)

North Florida junior Joey Petronio lines up his next putt shot on the 6th green. The Oregon men's golf team opens up day one of the NCAA West Regionals on Thursday, May 15, 2014 at the Eugene Country Club. (Andrew Seng/Emerald)

North Florida junior Joey Petronio lines up his next putt shot on the 6th green. The Oregon men’s golf team opens up day one of the NCAA West Regionals on Thursday, May 15, 2014 at the Eugene Country Club. (Andrew Seng/Emerald)

Eugene Country Club provides added benefit for Oregon men’s golf in NCAA Regionals

After missing the cut by just two strokes at the NCAA Regionals in 2013, Oregon men’s golf is in much better position to make a stab at the NCAA Championships this year, especially considering that Eugene Country Club, a course that the team typically trains at, will play host to it.

Ranked in the top 100 courses in the U.S. by Golf Digest and in the top 100 Modern courses by Golfweek, the Eugene Country Club is one of the more “unique” golf courses,  as sophomore Brandon McIver puts it. Certain elements — such as firmer than average greens and narrow playing surfaces — will play into the game when a contingent of teams vying for a spot in the NCAA Championships compete from May 15-17.

“It’s pretty tough,” head coach Casey Martin said in reference to the difficult elements the course presents. “It’s narrow, big trees, there’s a lot of visceral things about it. It’s very fair, but it is a little bit difficult, very challenging, so it’s going to be big test for us and everybody else.”

Oregon comes into the regional seeded seventh out of 12 teams. With a leveled pool of talented teams, eight of which are ranked in the top-50, it won’t be as if the Ducks will coast for the tournament’s entirety.

Jonathan Woo, who cracked the top 10 in both regionals he competed in as a freshman and sophomore, is even hoping that the team will grab a spot in this year’s NCAA Championships hosted in Hutchinson, Kansas and finish in the top three due to the circumstance they’re under.

“I think a good goal for us would be to finish in top three just because it is our home course and we know so much about it” said Woo, the lone upperclassman competing.

Woo’s statement is not an elevated expectation for this group’s fate this weekend by any means. Oregon has continually practiced at the Eugene Country Club this last month and will have a breadth of familiarity unlike any other team competing.

“We know Eugene well,” Martin said. “We’ve been playing there a lot. It’s going to be a really wonderful event and we’re excited to be hosting. Hopefully we can play our best golf and advance through.”

As a demanding course, the Eugene Country Club plays the mind game that Oregon’s golfers have played with each other this season. It was consistently veliminated throughout the season, however, with examples pointing to Sulman Raza and Woo’s emergence during separate points this season.

For the sophomore McIver, who has been arguably the Ducks’ most consistent golfer this season, the anxiety of playing in tournaments is a trait that he feels that he has calmed since January.

“There’s always a level of anxiousness,” McIver said. “We’ve improved on relaxing in tournaments … I’ve seen a lot more improvement.”

McIver also noted how this team seems ready to peak at the end of the year, citing that the prospect of playing in an environment the team is so familiar with can only enhance the already great chance the Ducks have this weekend.

Follow Justin Wise on Twitter @JWISE25

Oregon men’s golf: Faltering late drops Ducks to fifth place at The Goodwin

With its struggles in their last two tournaments behind them, Oregon looked to have made notable strides at The Goodwin in Stanford, Calif over the weekend. However, behind an insufficient second and final round, the Oregon men’s golf team dropped two places on Sunday and fell into a tie for fifth place. The Ducks proceeded to score a 285 5-over par on Sunday to score a 273-285-285—843 (+3) for the entire three days.

The host Stanford shot a tournament-low 266 14-under card on the day to win the title. Their final score of 268-281-266—815 (-25) outscored the next best team score from USC and UCLA , who tied for second, by 20 strokes.

Raza showed consistency dating back to the Duck Invitational by placing in a tie for 10th individually. The sophomore shot 68-72-68—208 (-2) over the weekend and has now posted top-10 finishes in three of his last four tournaments.

Brandon McIver sat in fourth place following the first two rounds and was in position to make a stab at the individual title Sunday. His score of 73 on the final day, which included two birdies and five bogeys, would drop him to a tie for 12th place though. Stanford’s Patrick Rogers would win The Goodwin’s individual title after posting the leading mark of 196 14-under. McIver would finish 13 strokes behind Rogers at 1-under par.

Thomas Lim finished his final round by bogeying both the 17th and 18th hole. The freshman finished one-over par on the day and two-over par over the course of the three days, with a a scorecard of 70-71-71—212 (+2).

Both Zach Foushee and Brandon Bumgarten rounded out the day and tournament for the Ducks with subpar finishes. Bumgarten, competing for the first time in the team segment, ended the tournament with a final card that read 73-72-75—220 (+10). Foushee, after hitting six bogeys Sunday, finished five strokes better than Bumgarten with a  69-73-73—215 (+5).

Head coach Casey Martin’s group will now receive a week break from competition, with their next tournament in Santa Cruz, Calif. for The Western Intercollegiate. The Intercollegiate comes just two weeks before the Pac-12 Championships, which will take place at Marana, Ariz. from April 25-27.