Ducks Basketball

Ducks Could Stay Local for NCAA Tournament

Lots can change quickly in college basketball, but with the Ducks’ latest win streak, they have a legitimate shot to play their first NCAA Tournament game in Portland — a de-facto home game for Oregon. In the his latest Bracketology, Joe...

Former Oregon men’s basketball assistant Brian Fish officially named Montana State’s 22nd head coach

On Monday, it was reported that Oregon assistant men’s basketball coach Brian Fish would be named head coach of the Montana State University men’s hoops program. The announcement became official Tuesday afternoon and Fish was named as the 22nd head coach in Bobcats history.

“I’m overwhelmed with emotion,” Fish said in a Montana State press conference Tuesday. “I’m very excited and feel really good that an Athletic Director such as Peter Fields and Montana State University believes in me and is trusting me with its basketball program.”

Fish leaves Oregon after four years as an assistant to Dana Altman, who worked with Fish in some capacity for 15 years.

“My first job was with Coach Altman and I ended up being with him for 15 years and I learned the business the right way, with integrity yet being able to win a lot of games,” Fish said. “We had a lot of kids graduate, and some of them had professional basketball careers and the one thing that was out of my control was the first person that hired me. That ended up being the luckiest thing that’s happened to me … I learned a great deal about coaching from Coach Altman, a great deal about how to develop a team and how to bring a team along.”

Fields praised Fish on multiple accounts, calling him “a tremendous student of the game of basketball.”

“He has great integrity,” Fields said. “He’s a very loyal person, a very hard worker, he’s committed to helping student-athletes succeed and he’s a tremendous student of the game of basketball.”

In addition to working with Altman at Oregon, Creighton and Marshall, Fish worked under Billy Tubbs at Texas Christian University and assisted Brad Holland at the University of San Diego.

“In my six years with Billy Tubbs I learned a totally different style of basketball,” Fish said. “We won a lot of games and I learned how to play up-tempo and I learned a lot of things just riding in a car with him going to see a recruit. Brad Holland was a great guy to work for and a great people person. He’s a very good coach, but was also very good at getting to know people and pushing the buttons to get the best out of them.”

Fish played collegiate basketball at Western Kentucky University from 1984-86 before transferring to Marshall, where he played from 1987-89 and graduated with a BA in sports management.

Follow Madison Guernsey on Twitter @guernseymd

Ducks Season Ends with Loss to Wisconsin

mbb ducks pic for web

MILWAUKEE, Wisc — Despite leading Wisconsin 49-37 at halftime, Oregon could not hold on to it’s momentum in the second half, and fell 85-77 to the Badgers, ending the Ducks season.

Joseph Young had a game high 29 points for the seventh-seed Ducks, who failed to reach their second straight Sweet 16.

Frank Kaminsky led the second-seed Badgers with 19 points. Wisconsin now advances to play the winner of Baylor/Creighton.

Oregon closes the season with a 24-10 overall record, having won an NCAA Tournament game in consecutive seasons for the first time in program history

 

 

 

 

 

Oregon men’s basketball: Joseph Young named to all-Pac-12 tournament team

Oregon junior guard Joseph Young was named to the all-tournament team following the conclusion of the Pac-12 tournament on Saturday.

Young averaged 24 points per game and shot 62.1 percent from the floor in Oregon’s two games against Oregon State and UCLA, leading the Ducks in scoring on both occasions. Young’s 29 points against the Bruins on Thursday were his most since he scored 29 against Arizona State on Feb. 8.

Joining Young on the all-tournament team are Arizona’s Nick Johnson and Aaron Gordon, Colorado’s Askia Booker and Stanford’s Chasson Randle.

UCLA sophomore Kyle Anderson was named the tournament’s most outstanding player. The Bruins beat Arizona in the tournament final 75-71.

Anderson averaged 15 points, 10.3 rebounds and six assists in three games and recorded a double-double in the championship game with 21 points and 15 rebounds.

Follow Madison Guernsey on Twitter @guernseymd

Former Duck Fred Jones to be inducted into Pac-12 Men’s Basketball Hall of Honor

Former Oregon standout Fred Jones will be inducted into the Pac-12 Men’s Basketball Hall of Honor. Jones was the captain of the Ducks team that won the 2010 Pac-10 championship and advanced to the Elite 8 of the NCAA Tournament.

Jones is remembered fondly for his flashy dunks during his time at Oregon and he’s tied for seventh all-time in total points scored. Jones also put together the third-highest scoring season in Oregon history with 650 during the 2001-02 season. Currently, Jones ranks in the top 10 in several statistical categories including assists (seventh), steals (fifth), blocked shots (T-fifth), field goals (10th) and free throws (seventh).

The Barlow High alum was a 2002 All-Pac-10 selection and was named team MVP for the 2001-02 season. He was a first round draft pick of the Indiana Pacers and played eight seasons in the NBA, highlighted by the 2004-05 season in which he averaged a career high 10.6 points per game and shot 85 percent from the free throw line.

Jones became the only Oregon player to win an NBA Slam Dunk Contest when he won in 2004 as a member of the Indiana Pacers. Following his NBA career, Jones played two seasons professionally overseas (Italy, China).

Jones and 11 other inductees will be honored March 14 during the Pac-12 Tournament at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas, Nev.

Follow Madison Guernsey on Twitter @guernseymd

Mike Moser May Not Be Selected in the NBA Draft

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College players may not get paid, but dollar signs are definitely on the line for Mike Moser.

During his sophomore season, Moser led a surprise UNLV team to a 24-9 record and a sixth seed in the NCAA tournament while averaging 14 points and 10.5 rebounds.  After the season, many draft experts predicted him to be a first round pick. However, he opted to play another year for the runnin rebels.

After a year of injury problems and playing with a future number one pick who happened to also be a stretch four, Moser fell of the NBA radar.

Last Spring, Moser considered making the leap to the NBA, but held back likely because he either would’ve been a late second round pick or not drafted at all.

At Oregon, Moser has had the opportunity to prove that he is a desirable NBA prospect once more.

Mike Moser trying to get around Stefan Nastic Photo - Dave Peaks
Mike Moser trying to get around Stefan Nastic
Photo – Dave Peaks

This season, Moser has failed to improve upon his play sophomore year. While he has proven to be a more handy outside shooter, his rebounding rate has declined exponentially. Despite playing for a team with no one else to carry the load on the boards, Moser is averaging three less rebounds per 40 minutes than he did as a sophomore. Plus he is averaging .9 less steals and .7 less assists per game.

But most importantly, he hasn’t proven to scouts that he wouldn’t be a defensive liability guarding bigger and stronger power forwards in the NBA. Moser has not been much better than the rest of his defensively challenged teammates this year. He’s consistently played average on ball defense while not protecting the rim effectively. Moser had 3.1 defensive win shares his first year at UNLV. This year, he’s just .8.

According to Draftexpress.com, Moser is the 31st ranked senior in the 2014 NBA Draft class. In 2013, 18 seniors were selected in the draft.

Suffice it to say, the one time potential first round pick finds himself on the outside looking in.

Moser may end up as a precautionary tale for all highly touted underclassmen, but if he can show that he can really get after it defensively and improve his rebounding, who knows, maybe David Stern, or more realistically, Adam Silver will call his name in June.

 

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