books

Roast Magazine Releases ‘Cheap Coffee: A Look Behind the Curtain of the Global Coffee Trade’

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Roast Magazine Releases Cheap Coffee Book

A Look Behind the Curtain of the Global Coffee Trade by Karl Wienhold

PORTLAND, Ore. (April 16, 2021) — A new book called “Cheap Coffee: A Look Behind the Curtain of the Global Coffee Trade” by Karl Wienhold looks at the supply chain of green coffee. The supply chain for coffee is broken. Cheap Coffee provides a broad explanation of the economics, mechanics and power structures that define the industry today. It is a readable and digestible synthesis of thousands of pages of academic literature and expert interviews, in disciplines ranging from economics to anthropology and from environmental science to history. Change, restructuring and conscientious participation from all stakeholders are needed if coffee farming is to be a viable livelihood for the next generation and part of the solution to the climate crisis that is upon us.

“I decided to write Cheap Coffee in hopes of fostering collaboration among diverse actors in the coffee industry, including consumers, through greater empathy,” Wienhold says. “Everyone can see the symptoms of the problems that exist around the coffee value chain — such as environmental degradation, poverty, and human rights issues — but I have found that individuals’ diagnoses of the root problems and drivers differ significantly. I hope the book will bust myths, absolve scapegoats and allow readers to comprehend the realities being faced by actors at different stages of the supply chain — their needs, struggles and goals — so that they can be better customers, suppliers and partners to one another.”

The 248-page paperback book sells for $14.95 paperback and $9.95 digital. Find out more at cheapcoffeebook.com.

About the author/photographer:

Karl Wienhold is a researcher, consultant, and operator of post-colonial rural development, specifically the intersection between agrarian communities and the global economy, endeavoring to understand and undo extractive power structures in favor of equitable alternatives. His professional background is in management consulting, agriculture, and coffee trading. He is the founder of an organization that advocates for the empowerment of smallholder coffee farmers in Colombia, where he calls home.

About Roast magazine:

Roast magazine is a bi-monthly technical trade magazine based in Portland, Oregon, dedicated to the success and growth of the specialty coffee industry. Roast addresses the art, science and business of coffee roasters by covering the issues most important to them with quality editorial content focused on the technical aspects of coffee. For more information, visit roastmagazine.com


Media contact: Lily Kubota
Phone: 503.282.3399
Email: [email protected]

Source: Roast Magazine

The Entrepreneur’s Guide to Cannabis

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Thinking about getting into the “Green Rush” but not sure where to begin? Pick up this book to hear tips and stories from 25 successful leaders in the cannabis industry.

Last update was in: March 12, 2018 1:27 am

The post The Entrepreneur’s Guide to Cannabis appeared first on Stoner Toolbox.

Unicorns on Bad Trips: A Coloring Book

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This hilarious coloring book includes over 30 ready-to-color images taking you straight into the trips of a set of adventurous unicorns. We approve.

Unicorns on Bad Trips: A Coloring Book


Free shipping

$9.99


12 new from $9.99


5 used from $10.04

Last update was in: February 25, 2018 2:07 am

The post Unicorns on Bad Trips: A Coloring Book appeared first on Stoner Toolbox.

Cannabis Oil QuickStart Guide: The Simplified Beginner’s Guide to Cannabis Oil

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This book is a comprehensive guide to the creation and usage of cannabis oil. Touted for many years as a miracle medical treatment, the book examines both the historical, medical, and practical perspectives of oil consumption.

$14.20
14.95



18 new from $13.29



10 used from $12.02


Free shipping

Last update was in: February 13, 2018 12:57 am

The post Cannabis Oil QuickStart Guide: The Simplified Beginner’s Guide to Cannabis Oil appeared first on Stoner Toolbox.

Big Weed

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In this book, the founder of the fastest-growing marijuana company in the world talks industry and entrepreneurship in the face of legalization, including predictions for the future of the world of cannabis.

Last update was in: February 13, 2018 1:44 pm

The post Big Weed appeared first on Stoner Toolbox.

Library to Host Handmade Books Workshops

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EUGENE, Ore. — You can find more than books at the Eugene Public Library.

It’s an experience with authors, artists and weekly workshop. This week, the library is hosting a workshop where you can make your own book.

Connie Bennett, the Eugene Library Services Director, explains more about the handmade books workshop for adults.

Here are the workshop locations and times:

Sheldon Branch: Tuesday, April 8, 6:00 p.m.
Bethel Branch: Tuesday, April 15, 6:00 p.m.

This event is made possible by Eugene Public Library, Friends of the Eugene Public Library and Eugene Public Library Foundation.

Kids Compete in Battle of the Books

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SPRINGFIELD, Ore. — Thousands of Lane County students read their way into a book battle. Saturday the teams went head to head for a shot at a Battle of the Books state competition.

Since the start of the school year, kids became experts on more than a dozen books and competed against other teams within their school. Saturday the best teams from their schools went head to head in the regional competition.

For students competing in the Battle of the Books, a question on a book is something they could answer in just a matter of seconds. “We practiced, we read a lot,” said Maya Hampton, Walterville Elementary School student.

“They agree to read 16 books in common with kids all over the state and these extra books. So these are 16 books that they aren’t assigned in school,” said Paul Weill, Springfield School District curriculum coordinator.

The students battling in the classrooms at Thurston High School have been training for this competition for several months.

“These are teams that won the school battles, so they were champions in their schools, so they battled it out with lots of kids to get here,” said Weill.

For the Walterville Elementary School team, they had to recruit a new member for the competition. “He was on another team before, but then we needed an alternate and so he took a test and he got on our team,” said Hampton.

Walterville was just one of the 48 teams competing, all trying to finish in the top three to go to the state competition. Even though many of the teams didn’t make it past Saturday’s competition, the incentive to read was worth every minute.

“Kids are reading a lot and they get excited about books which is really important because reading motivation is as important as the instructions of reading for kids to be successful and move on with their academic careers,” said Weill.

The three teams that qualified for state at the competition were the O’Hara Catholic School, Edgewood Elementary School, and Ridgeline Elementary School.

The Book Monster #18

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I took my wife on a date to see the movie “Austenland” at the dollar theater at the Gateway Mall on Thursday (I wasn’t quite sure what to expect). The movie is about a Jane-Austen-obsessed woman (played by Keri Russell) attending a Jane-Austen-themed resort where women pay big money to experience what it’s like to be in a Jane-Austenish romance with gentlemanly actors (no touching!). I LOLed throughout the movie and I was pleasantly surprised by this chick-flick. Russell’s rendition of “Hot in Here,” by the rapper Nelly, was fantastic too. Jane Seymour, Bret McKenzie and Jennifer Coolidge also starred. I haven’t read any of Jane Austen’s work. Even after seeing this movie I can’t say I have any desire to read Jane Austen’s novels. There is no appeal. However, there is a chance I’ll try Austen and Seth Grahame-Smith’s “Pride and Prejudice with Zombies.”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=36nk3NEyCLU

A note: For the time being, The Book Monster is going bi-weekly!.

An observation: I have been drinking a ridiculous amount of tea lately. Yogi brand Echinacea Immune Support tea is delicious, it has a hint of mint among other natural flavors, and is perfect for sipping while reading on a dreary day during fall or winter.

Book news:

Infomercial pitchman Kevin Trudeau was found guilty of Criminal Contempt for making false claims about his book, “The Weightloss Cure “They” Don’t Want You to Know About.” National Public Radio reported, “In a series of infomercials, Trudeau claimed the book revealed a “miracle substance” discovered in the 1950s and kept secret by food companies and the government that allows people to eat anything, not exercise and not gain weight.” According to NPR, Trudeau violated a 2004 court order that prohibited him from making false claims in his book.

The Los Angeles Times reported that in Lafourche Parish, La. voters decided to continue to fund the library over diverting funds to the jail. Parish Council Chair Lindel Toups said libraries have too much money than blasted libraries for the activities taking place inside such as, “teaching Mexicans to speak English.”

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Mark Twain didn’t want his autobiography published until 100 years after his death.

The second volume of Mark Twain’s Autobiography was released. Ben Tarnoff’s review in The New Yorker is fantastic: “When Mark Twain opened his mouth, strange things came tumbling out. Things like hoaxes, jokes, yarns, obscenities, and non sequiturs. He had a drawl—his “slow talk,” his mother called it—that made his sentences long and sinuous. One reporter described it as a “little buzz-saw slowly grinding inside a corpse.” Others thought that he sounded drunk.” 

DarkmansWhat I’ve been reading:

Nicola Barker’s “Darkmans” is a mixed bag. This borderline-experimental book was hilarious but I felt it was too long (838 pages). I was underwhelmed by the ending of the book too (I think I missed something and I may go back through and skim over certain key points in the book and then finish the last chapter). During my reading of this book I moved from New Mexico back to Oregon and I was sidetracked by travel, friends, family, and other books (this may have to do with the underwhelming ending too). Set in England, the book follows an eclectic cast of characters (Barker’s character development was fantastic) through a series of strange events, some more exciting than others, as history subtly lurks in the shadows and pushes some characters to madness.

I’m a sucker for nostalgia. Earlier this year I nabbed “Winnie the Pooh” from my parents house in Beaverton and this last week I started reading it. Author A.A. Milne wrote the Pooh books at the request of the adult non-fictionalized version of Christopher Robin, Milne’s son. The books are a result of Milne telling stories to his son.  After WinnieThePoohreading the first two chapters of the book I realized this book should have an alternate title: “Winnie the Pooh, or A.A. Milne is Clever.”  Clever indeed, and I chuckle just thinking about the antics of Pooh and friends. The simple nature of the characters results in a lot of well-intentioned bad ideas that are enacted by this cast of Christopher Robin’s stuffed animals. I wouldn’t recommend this book to everybody, but if you like to laugh and you don’t mind reading a book geared towards children, read it.

Other things I’ve been reading:

• Neil Gaiman’s “The Graveyard Book.”

• Selections from Mas Udi’s “The Meadows of Gold.”

• “Bears: A Brief History,” by Bernd Brunner.

• The May 2013 issue of Outside magazine.

• The Mountains of Madness, by H.P. Lovecraft.

• A couple poems from the Winter 2013 issue of “The Gettysburg Review.

Don’t forget to share this column with your friends who love to read. Also, I’d love to hear from you if you have any comments, requests, rants, praises, or two-sentence book reviews or anything else that has to do with books and literature. Hell, if you send me an e-mail you could end up in the column: [email protected]

 

The Book Monster #17 (Relaunch)

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October 30, 2013 

After a 10 month hiatus, I am relaunching my column “The Book Monster.” 

For those who have never visited my column before I would like to welcome you and invite you to keep coming back. I also invite you to read some of my old columns. The Book Monster discusses books, publishing news, authors, literature in pop culture, and anything else that has to do with books. Feel free to comment with Facebook. I would also love to hear from my readers whether you have questions, comments, etc. You can contact me by e-mail (the box with the “e” inside, below my bio) or via Twitter (the box with the “T” inside).

To my readers both faithful and intermittent I apologize for the abrupt death of the column in December; my career took me elsewhere.

Goth, vamps, and Edgar Allan Poe teamed up to save the world from emo kids last week on South Park.
Goth, vamps, and Edgar Allan Poe teamed up to save the world from emo kids last week on South Park.

This being the eve of Halloween I feel inclined to touch upon Edgar Allan Poe, father of the horror genre, who appeared last week “South Park” as the original goth. During the episode titled “Goth Kids 3,” Poe accused the goth kids of South Park Elementary of being poseurs. South Park creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone never fail in their ability to polk fun at anything and everyone, and their portrayal of Poe was hilarious. 

Poe’s masterpiece “The Raven” may be his best poem, and Christopher Walken’s reading of the poem is excellent. Enjoy:

CoralineThis past weekend I read Neil Gaiman’s “Coraline.” I heard the Tim Burton adaptation of the book was terrible and I have never seen it. The New York Times Book Review dubbed “Coraline,” “One of the most frightening books ever written.” With a review like that I couldn’t resist reading it. “Coraline” follows in the tradition of C.S. Lewis’ “Chronicles of Narnia” in that Coraline finds a door in her home that leads to another world, only this is a world where everything is a sinister replica of the real world. Quality of plot and quality of writing made it easy for me to overlook the fact that the book is written at an elementary reading level. I wish I could’ve read “Coraline” when I was a Goosebumps obsessed third grader, but I still loved the book as an adult. This book wasn’t the most frightening I’ve read, but as far as children’s literature goes this book takes the cake.

Technology has changed the face of the publishing industry and online literary journals are popping all over the internet and the best thing about them is they are free. Wig Leaf publishes fiction under 1,000 words a handful of times every month, although I have not figured out their publishing frequency. I cannot vouch for all the fiction that is published on the site, but I have come across a few great stories at Wig Leaf. Finding a short story worth reading only takes a little bit of searching on this site.

 

 

 

Book Review – Enter at Your Own Risk: Fires and Phantoms

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The cover artwork for Enter at Your Own Risk: Fires and Phantoms, edited by Dr. Alex Scully.
The cover artwork for Enter at Your Own Risk: Fires and Phantoms, edited by Dr. Alex Scully.

Enter at Your Own Risk: Fires and Phantoms is the second installment in editor Dr. Alex Scully’s horror anthology series to be published by local indy press Firbolg Publishing. The common thread running through the tales this time around is homosexuality, which may turn away some potential readers, but it should be noted that Dr. Scully manages to avoid the common editorial pitfall of pounding the reader over the head with her anthology’s thematic linkage at every turn by including a diverse selection of stories ranging from ones in which LGBTQ-ness is central to the plot to others in which it is merely implied.

Along with its main theme, Fires and Phantoms also carries on the theme of its predecessor, Enter at Your Own Risk: Old Masters, New Voices, by mixing in some rather excellent stories by older writers like Edith Wharton and Ralph Adams Cram. One can only hope that the addition of masterworks by authors from previous literary eras will continue to be a hallmark of the series going forward, although their presence does have the unfortunate effect of highlighting the unevenness of the contemporary stories that make up the bulk of the anthology.

Following a short introduction by horror novelist Robert Dunbar extolling the genre’s lack of literary status as a virtue that has granted horror writers the freedom to explore taboo subjects long before it was considered safe to do so in mainstream fiction (and an even shorter foreword by Dr. Scully), Fires and Phantoms starts off with “Alone,” a short poem by Edgar Allan Poe that evokes a certain sense of otherness and isolation that should help readers get themselves into the proper mindset to enjoy the stories to come.

However, the mood set by Poe’s work is spoiled somewhat by the first piece of prose fiction in the collection, “When You Are Right” by Robbie Anderson. The setup of Anderson’s story is interesting enough – a policeman working the night shift waits in the car while his partner patronizes a creepy house of ill repute – but it reads like a rough outline, rushing ahead to its conclusion without pausing to give the reader much in the way of interesting detail or characterization. Thankfully, the next story in the anthology, “Time for One More Show” by local Eugene author B.E. Scully, gets things back on the right track with a much more interesting tale involving a lesbian stripper who becomes enthralled by a seductive mirror-bound apparition, but the difference in quality from one story to the next throughout Fire and Phantoms is stark enough that it may prove an insurmountable annoyance to some readers.

Another peculiarity that detracts somewhat from the collection is the inclusion of three stories – “A Decent Cup of Tea” by Michele Cacano, “In the End, He Dreams” by Michael Meeske, and “Inheritance” by Richard May – that read suspiciously like romance stories that were only submitted for consideration because they happened to have ghosts in them. That doesn’t necessarily mean they’re bad stories, but their lovelorn tone would be more at home in a Harlequin Romance novel than a gothic horror anthology.

That said, Fires and Phantoms includes far more good stories than bad, and only one tale in the second category (Chad Stroup’s “Prickle the Ivories”) truly sinks to the level of unreadably awful. Along with B.E. Scully’s salacious tale, other contemporary gems here include T. Fox Dunham’s supernatural Civil War story “Last Dance in the Rain,” Vincent Waters’ macabre tale of a devout, troubled husband “Promises in the Dark, Whispers at Dawn,” and Andrew Wolter’s surprisingly enjoyable re-imagining of Poe’s “The Tell-Tale Heart” coyly entitled “A New Heart That Tells a Tale.”

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Edith Wharton

But as good as those modern stories are, the best ones in the entire anthology are the three oldest: Wharton’s compellingly understated “The Eyes,” Richard Hall’s ghostly trip through the history of LGBTQ literature “Country People” (which, fittingly enough, inspired the creation of this anthology), and the one story in the book I found genuinely disquieting on a visceral level, “In Kropfsberg Keep” by Ralph Adams Cram. Dr. Scully merits some applause for that last selection; Cram’s body of work as an architect may still be relatively well known, but his literary output has rather undeservedly fallen into obscurity over the years.

Again, its homosexual themes may put off some people, but the stories Dr. Scully has assembled here are by no means just for LGBTQ readers. It’s far from perfect (what anthology is?), but if you’re a fan of gothic horror, Fire and Phantoms does enough things right to justify picking up a copy on your next visit to the bookstore.

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