bread

Steamed Brown Bread

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Steamed bread is a bit of an unusual thing, chewy texture, moist and in the case of this brown bread rich with molasses flavor. I really like molasses so I tend to keep blackstrap molasses on hand, but that can be a bit strong for this bread, use it if that’s what you have but I’d recommend the regular stuff. The other fun thing about this bread is you steam it in a can, then shake it out and slice it into rings, you can make it in a muffin tin or loaf pan, but that’s no fun. I used two 24 oz cans to steam my bread and they ended up baking right up to the top of the can so if you use something smaller split it into more cans.

 








Steamed Brown Bread


Ingredients

  • 2 -24oz empty cans for steaming the bread
  • butter for greasing the cans
  • ¾ c white flour
  • ½ c rye flour
  • ½ c cornmeal
  • ½ c quick oats or whole oats ground up a little
  • ¾ tsp. baking powder
  • ¾ tsp. baking soda
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • ¾ c raisins, soaked in hot water and drained
  • ¾ c molasses
  • 1 ½ c buttermilk

Directions

  1. Preheat the oven to 325F, heat up water to make a water bath for steaming the bread and grease 2-18oz cans with butter.
  2. Mix together the dry ingredients and then toss the soaked raisins with the dry ingredients to coat them, this will prevent them sinking to the bottom of the cans.
  3. Add in the molasses and buttermilk, mix till fully incorporated and divide between the two cans, about 18 oz each.
  4. Cover the tops tightly with foil, place in a 2-inch-deep pan and fill ¾ of the way with hot water.
  5. Bake at 325F for 2 hours and 15 minutes.
  6. Slice and serve with butter or fry in butter till crispy.

The post Steamed Brown Bread first appeared on Seasoned At Sea.

Parmesan Garlic Toast

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Garlic bread is an easily gobbled up side dish, the only way to balance out that fact is to make a lot of it. Usually when I make garlic bread I take that extra step and make the bread myself, it just seems like a no brainer on a boat with limited space, why store fragile bread when you can just make it. This recipe skips that step and I’m totally okay with it because it’s a recipe from my grandfather, I can’t imagine doing this on anything but store bought sourdough. Sure I could make my own sourdough bread, but there’s something nostalgic in doing it the same way my grandfather did, plus it’s easier and more of it can be made quickly. This isn’t just garlic bread, it’s parmesan garlic toast dusted with paprika and then toasted in the oven till the cheese is bubbly. That little addition of smoked paprika makes all the difference, not only is it visually appealing, but it adds great flavor to a classic dish.

 






Parmesan Garlic Toast


Ingredients

  • ¾ c butter
  • 10 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1 loaf of sliced sourdough bread (16-18 slices)
  • 1 c shaky parmesan
  • paprika

Directions

  1. Preheat the broiler on high.
  2. Melt the butter with the garlic and salt.
  3. Brush and spoon the melted butter mixture onto the slices of bread and divide the crushed garlic bits evenly between the slices.
  4. Evenly sprinkle the parmesan over the bread, about 1 tablespoon per slice and dust the paprika over the top of each slice.
  5. Place the bread onto a baking sheet and place under the broiler for 3 minutes, keep a close eye on the bread and rotate often, the bread is done when the edges have started to brown.

Malakoff Loaf

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52 weeks of cooking – The Alps

When cooking for a crowd I try to find alternatives to making individual appetizers, it takes too much time fiddling with small things, why not make a few huge ones and slice it up.

This week’s Reddit challenge is make something from the Alps, when you think of that region cheese is the first thing to come to mind. While searching for ideas on what to make I kept going back to these fried cheese things called Malakoff, a slice of bread heaped with a cheese mixture and fried till crispy. I really wanted to make them, but everyone would want two which would mean making at least 50 of them, no thanks. If I had a proper fryer that made it easy to control the heat and I wasn’t on a sail boat where there is the potential for the hot oil to jump out at me I’d be more willing. In these situations, I turn towards the oven, she’s always my friend.

I made two large loafs of bread with soft interiors and light crispy crusts, cut them in half lengthwise and slathered them in the grated cheese mixture and baked. They were heavenly, the bread was browned, the top layer of the cheese was crisp while the under layer was like molten lava when I cut into them straight out of the oven. Usually for hot baked goods I like to wait at least 10 minutes before serving so people don’t burn their mouths, but this has to be served and eaten right away so you get the gooey fondue effect.

 









Malakoff Loaf


Ingredients

  • 1 loaf of soft bread
  • 4 -6 tbsp. butter, softened
  • 32 oz gruyere cheese, grated (8c)
  • 6 tbsp. flour
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1/4 tsp. nutmeg
  • 1/2 c hard cider or white wine
  • 4 eggs, lightly beaten
  • 4 garlic cloves, crushed

Directions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350F.
  2. Slice the bread in half lengthwise, slather both pieces with the softened butter, bake at 350 for about 10-15 minutes until the cut sides are golden brown.
  3. Toss together the cheese, flour, salt and nutmeg.
  4. Whisk together the hard cider, eggs and crushed garlic in a measuring cup, pour over the cheese and mix together with a spatula.
  5. Divide the cheese mixture in half and spread evenly to the edges of each half loaf.
  6. Bake at 350F for 10 minutes and then move the bread under the broiler and broil for 3 minutes or until the top is a dark golden brown and a little crispy.
  7. Slice and serve immediately so the cheese is hot and gooey.
  8. Preheat the oven to 350F.
  9. Slice the bread in half lengthwise, slather both pieces with the softened butter, bake at 350 for about 10-15 minutes until the cut sides are golden brown.
  10. Toss together the cheese, flour, salt and nutmeg.
  11. Whisk together the hard cider, eggs and crushed garlic in a measuring cup, pour over the cheese and mix together with a spatula.
  12. Divide the cheese mixture in half and spread evenly to the edges of each half loaf.
  13. Bake at 350F for 10 minutes and then move the bread under the broiler and broil for 3 minutes or until the top is a dark golden brown and a little crispy.
  14. Slice and serve immediately so the cheese is hot and gooey.

Pork Floss Buns

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52 weeks of baking – Local Favorites

When I was a kid and went to the mall with my friends on the weekend we’d usually see a movie, get a fancy coffee and browse through the book store. Before I left to return home I’d often stop at my favorite bakery, Bread Talk, they are known for their creative breads with cute names. Crouching tiger hidden bacon: bread spiraled with ham and cheese, buns in the shape of a face stuffed with meat and cakes decorated with whipped cream and intricate fruit. My all time favorite item was pork floss buns, fluffy, slightly sweet bun smeared with mayonnaise and pressed into pork floss. Pork floss is the cotton candy of the meat world, dehydrated pork jerky is shredded into threads and toasted with a little sugar. It has an unique texture, dry, crumbly and a little grainy at the same time, but the moisture from the mayo helps with that and it’s all apart of the experience.

 












Pork Floss Buns


  • Yield:
    6 large or 12 small buns
  • Category:
    ,

Ingredients

Sponge

  • 1 ½ c flour
  • 1 tsp. yeast
  • 1 tsp. sugar
  • 3/4 c water

Dough

  • 1 ½ c flour
  • ½ tsp yeast
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1/4 c sugar
  • 2 egg
  • 2 tbsp. butter, softened

Topping

  • mayo
  • 4 oz pork floss

Directions

Sponge

  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer mix together the sponge ingredients until uniform, cover and let rest for 3 hours.

Dough

  1. Add all of the dough ingredients to the sponge except the butter, add a hook attachment and turn on the mixer. Once the dough has formed into a ball add the softened butter and continue to knead for 8 minutes. Cover the dough and let rest in a warm spot for 1 hour.
  2. Turn out the dough onto a floured surface and divide the dough into 6 or 12 pieces. Shape the pieces into elongated ovals and place on greased baking trays, cover and let rest for 1 hour.
  3. Preheat the oven to 375F before the rising time has finished. Bake at 375 for 10-15 minutes depending on the size of your buns.

Topping

  1. Let the buns cool completely, make a shallow incision along the top of the bun, spread some mayo into the incision and then slather the top with a generous amount of may, not enough that it drips off. Spread the pork floss on a plate and press the mayo side of the bread into the floss, pack a little more on and tap off some the excess.

Lemon Focaccia with Manchego

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52 weeks of baking – Citrus

I love me some good crispy focaccia.

Focaccia is the bread that inspired me to ask the cook on Bounty to teach me how to make bread. She was kneading it in a large bowl, one had covered in sticky dough while the other hand added a bit of flour here and there to get the consistency right. There was something memorizing about watching her work and the end product was great. Some of the other crew had been making bread in the middle of the night, on the 12-4 watch, but all of their loaves turned out like bricks and weren’t that great to eat. I wanted to try my hand at making something edible, I wanted a real bread lesson from someone who knew what they were doing.

Over the years I’ve tried several different recipes, but I keep going back to the one I got from the cook that taught me how to make bread. It’s been tweaked over the years from the original, but I love that it’s one of the first recipes for bread I ever used. The top of this focaccia is garnished with manchego cheese, fresh rosemary and thin slices of lemon that remain tart and bright after they have been baked. This bread is best devoured shortly out of the oven while the cheese is crispy and the lemons are soft, I bet it would be just as good the next day but I wouldn’t know, mine got gobbled up in minutes and yours will too.








Lemon Focaccia with Manchego


Ingredients

Dough

  • 3 1/4 c flour
  • 1 1/4 tsp. yeast
  • 1 1/2 tsp. tsp salt
  • 1 1/2 tbsp. sugar
  • 1 tbsp. olive oil
  • 1 c water
  • 2 tbsp. oil (to grease cast iron)

Toppings

  • 1 tbsp. olive oil
  • 1/2 c grated manchego cheese
  • 1 lemon, sliced thin
  • 1 tbsp. fresh rosemary, chopped
  • 1 tsp. coarse salt
  • 1/2 tsp. sugar

Directions

Dough

  1. Add all of the dough ingredients, not the 2 tablespoons oil, into the bowl of a stand mixer. Knead for 8-10 minutes, gradually adding more water if necessary. Cover and rest in a warm spot for 1 hour and 30 minutes.
  2. In a large cast iron pan add the 2 tablespoons of oil and swirl it around, scoop out the dough into the pan. Flip the dough over so it is completely covered in oil, use your fingers to dimple the dough and stretch it to fill the pan. Cover and let rest 1 hour.
  3. Preheat the oven to 500F, once preheated assemble the toppings.

Toppings

  1. Drizzle the top of the dough with 1 tablespoon of olive oil.
  2. Sprinkle the dough with the manchego, arrange the lemon slices evenly on top, garnish with the rosemary and salt. For the sugar only sprinkle it on the lemons, this will help them carmalized and get some color.
  3. Turn down the oven to 425F and baked the focaccia covered with tin foil for 15 minutes, remove the foil and bake a further 15 minutes. Total cooking time 30 minutes. The bottom of the focaccia should be golden brown and crispy when finished. If you don’t have enough color on your bread pop it under a preheated broiler for a minute or so, keeping a close eye on it.

Chili and Cilantro Bread

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52 weeks of baking – Leavened Breads

I’m very grateful that I’m not one of those people who thinks cilantro taste like soap. I love it so much that I eat it by the handful when it’s over growing in the garden. For me I can never have enough cilantro and it’s a great addition to most dishes, even just a few leaves for a garnish adds a pinch of brightness. Unfortunately, when cilantro gets cooked it looses a lot of flavor, while developing this recipe I kept packing in more cilantro to the bread, but it never really popped. Once I decided to pair it with green onion as part of the topping it came through a lot more, but it’s still just a general herby flavor and not ‘oooh I’m cilantro.’

The chili in the bread hits you after you’ve swallowed and it’s a bit warmer than you might expect from a bread, it has a good tingle that keeps you going for more. I highly recommend you use the sriracha chili and garlic paste, it has a lot more flavor and heat compared to the sriracha squirty sauce. If you are a cilantro and chili fan, watch out, this bread gets devoured quick, so make sure you get your fair share before it disappears. If you can’t handle any heat then reduce the chili to 1/3 of a cup, any less and you won’t taste it and it’ll be pointless.

 








Chili and Cilantro Bread


Ingredients

Dough

  • 3 c bread flour
  • 2 tsp. yeast
  • 1 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 2 tbsp. sugar
  • 1 c chopped cilantro (about 1 bunch)
  • 1/2 c sriracha chili and garlic paste
  • 1/2 c milk
  • 2 tbsp. butter, melted
  • 1 egg

Topping

  • 1 c chopped cilantro (about 1 bunch)
  • 3 green onions, chopped
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 tbsp. olive oil
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1/2 tsp. sugar

Directions

Dough

  1. Add all of the ingredients for the dough in a stand mixer bowl, with a hook attachment knead the bread for 8 minutes until you have a smooth but tacky ball of dough. Let rest for 2 hours in a warm spot, don’t work if it doesn’t double in size, there is a lot in the dough that is holding it back.
  2. Turn the dough out onto a floured surface and flatten into a round disc, place on a greased baking tray and cover. Let rise for 1 hour.
  3. Preheat the oven to 350F.

Topping

  1. Mix all of the ingredients for the topping in a bowl, you have to do this at the last moment otherwise the salt will start to draw out moisture from the cilantro and onions and make it watery.
  2. Gently scatter the topping over the dough and spread it out evenly to the edges. With a razor blade or sharp knife, sore the edge of the dough, just under where the topping stops.
  3. Bake at 350F for 30 minutes until the edges are golden brown and a thermometer reads an internal temperature of at least 190F.

Dampfnudel

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52 weeks of baking – Great British Bake Off

I love the Great British Bake Off. Who doesn’t?! Amazing bakes, a few disasters, a bit of comedy and best of all so many new ideas of things I didn’t know existed.

One of the most interesting things that I hadn’t ever heard of was dampfnudel, a steamed German dumpling with custard and plum sauce. This was a technical challenge back in season 4, back when they covered a little history or had some story behind a lot of their technical challenges and there was a song. You have to watch this video, it’s a whole song about dampfnudel, it’s amazing!

I’m good at baking and I’d make dessert all the time if my husband had a stronger sweet tooth, so instead I bake in a savory direction. I took the idea of dessert dampfnudel and figured they’d work really well to accompany some German sausage, just a little less sugar. This bread is made in a unique way, the bread is steamed in a little bath, the liquid eventually evaporates and the bottoms start to crisp with a little sticky goo accumulating around the edges.

My savory dampfnudel are steamed in beef stock with a little bit of sugar to help the bottoms caramelize and some butter resulting in a beautiful reduced liquid. The dumplings themselves are fluffy and tender, they scream out to be dragged through a pool of gravy soaking up the last remains of sauce with your meal.

 









Dampfnudel


Ingredients

Dumpling dough

  • 2 3/4 c all purpose flour
  • 1 tbsp. yeast
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1 tbsp. sugar
  • 1 eggs
  • 1/4 c butter, melted
  • 1/2 c milk

Steaming

  • 1 c beef broth
  • 3 tbsp. butter
  • 1 tbsp. sugar
  • 2 dashes worcestershire sauce

Directions

Dumpling dough

  1. Mix all the dough ingredients together in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a hook attachment, add more milk as needed. Knead for 7 minutes until the dough is smooth.
  2. Rest the dough for an hour in a lightly greased bowl covered with a towel in a warm spot.

Steaming liquid

  1. In a large pan with a tight fitting lid add all of the ingredients for the steaming liquid, turn on to medium low heat.
  2. Divide the dough into 8 pieces, pinch and roll them into tight balls and place them in the pan, evenly spaced.
  3. Put on the lid and steam for 25 minutes, do not remove the lid, do not peak or the dough will deflate.
  4. Remove the lid and steam for a further 5 minutes to reduce the liquid. Check the bottom of the dumplings, cook until golden brown and a little crispy.

Mallorcas

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52 weeks of baking – Sweet & Savory

I always seek out authentic food when I travel, I have a taste for the real thing, I want to eat what the locals eat and sometimes that means waking up early before the rest of the tourist. There’s nothing wrong with going to a popular spot packet with tourist, but they might be eating there just because it looked good to them, you have to hunt down the locals and eat what they eat. In Puerto Rico there was coffee shop that ended up being bigger than expected when we fist stepped inside. Their menu was short and to the point, whatever pastries you desired out the fancy case, pancakes, a few basic omelet options and then a selection of mallorcas or Spanish danishes. These danishes could have any combination of butter, bacon, ham, cheese and or egg in between two halves of this spiral bun dusted with powdered sugar.

These buns are not just any ordinary breakfast roll, the dough has eggs and butter, then more butter is painted on while they are shaped and before going in the oven. You’d think with all that butter they’d end up greasy and heavy, but quite the opposite, the butter soaks in leaving a golden crust and the texture of the bread is fluffy and rich. They are then heated up, sliced open, grilled on their cut sides with even more butter and filled, I like bacon, egg and cheese best and finished with a flurry of powdered sugar.

 









Mallorcas


Ingredients

Dough

  • 5 c flour
  • 4 tsp. yeast
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1/2 c sugar
  • 1 c milk
  • 4 eggs, beaten
  • 1/2 c butter, softened

To shape

  • 6 tbsp. butter, melted

To serve

  • fried egg
  • bacon or ham
  • cheddar or swiss cheese
  • powdered sugar

Directions

Dough

  1. In a stand mixer fitted with a dough hook add the dry ingredients, turn the mixer on and add the milk and beaten eggs. Knead for two minutes.
  2. Once the dough begins to pull away from the sides of the bowl add knobs of softened butter. Knead for about 8 minutes, total kneading time 10 minutes.
  3. Transfer the dough to a lightly oiled bowl rolling it over to coat the dough to prevent it from drying out. Cover and let rise for about 2 hours or until doubled in size.

To shape

  1. Grease two baking sheets.
  2. Deflate the dough and divide it in half, roll the dough into an 18 by 12-inch rectangle and brush with 2 tablespoons of melted butter leaving a 1-inch board along the upper edges. Roll the dough into a tight cylinder and pinch the long seam closed. Repeat with the reaming half of the dough.
  3. Cut each cylinder into 8 pieces for a total of 16. Stretch and roll each piece into a 10-inch length, lightly brush with melted butter and coil into a spiral, tuck the tail end underneath.
  4. Place 8 rolls on each tray equal distance apart, poke your finger into the center of each spiral and gently press down. Cover the buns with a clean cloth and let raise for about 2 hours or until you poke gently with a finger and it springs back minimally.
  5. Bake at 350F for about 15 minutes, rotating half way through, the buns should be golden brown by this point.

To serve

  1. Slice the mallorcas in half, butter both halves and place butter side down on a griddle, cook on low heat until the buns are warm the the insides are toasted.
  2. Meanwhile fry an egg, cook up some bacon or ham. Fill the rolls and dust with powdered sugar.

Potato Farls

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52 weeks of baking – Irish

I love unique museums; I seek them out every where I go. The surgical history museum in Chicago, cat art in Amsterdam, shoe museum in Toronto and the butter museum in Cork, Ireland.

Who knew there was enough information and history on butter for there to be a whole museum dedicated to it. Well the museum is on the small side but it used to be the location of a butter market and at one point it was the biggest butter market in the world. It now houses everything buttered related from an old butter bucket dug up from a bog, different styles of churns, butter wrapper collection and the day we were there a guy was giving a butter demonstration of different churns. They also have a collection of stories dedicated to the folklore of butter, lots of tales of witches stealing butter and magical dashers from fairy trees helping to produce a fortunes worth of butter. The thing that makes Irish butter so beloved is its flavor; that flavor comes from the cows and those cows are grass fed unlike cows from other regions that are fed on pellets.

So now what are you going to put your butter on? How about something very classic to the Irish Isle, potato farls. They are a cross between soda bread and mashed potatoes, thin little bread pancakes grilled in butter till golden brown on both sides. Their texture is the thing I find so unique, crispy on the outside while the middle is tender and creamy from the potatoes. Other than butter these potato cakes go beautifully with a classic Irish breakfast or at the very least eggs and bacon.

 






Potato Farls

 

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 lb russet potatoes
  • 1/4 c butter, plus more for frying
  • 1/2 – 3/4 c flour
  • 1 tsp. baking soda
  • 1 tsp. salt

Directions

  1. Peel and boil the potatoes till they are very soft, drain, return to the pot and place back on the heat turned off. This allows the potatoes to steam, drawing out more moisture so you don’t have to add more flour.
  2. Add the butter to the potatoes and mash thoroughly, you don’t want any lumps, if you have a ricer or food mill, use it.
  3. Add the remaining ingredients and stir till everything comes together, tip out onto a floured work surface and knead for a few minutes till everything is well combined. The dough is very soft at this point, don’t be afraid to continue to dust with flour as you work or it will stick to everything.
  4. Divide the dough into four pieces and pat each one into a ball. Roll each ball into a circle about ½ an inch thick and cut the circle into quarters.
  5. Fry in butter over medium heat for 3 minutes per side or until golden brown and crisp all over. Traditionally this is served with a full Irish breakfast, fried eggs, mushroom, sausage, roasted tomatoes and baked beans. Don’t forget the butter!

Baguette

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52 weeks of baking – 5 ingredients or less

On Bounty every watch had a chore to do, most of it was dishes, galley clean up, sweeping and mopping floors and cleaning the heads (toilets). The best chore of all was on the midnight to 4am watch, making bread.

This was the captain’s idea, the bread that the crew was producing went right back to them for snacks, it gave the cook one less thing to do. One afternoon the whole crew was gathered for a bread making lesson, the captain didn’t measure anything, just threw together flour, yeast, salt and water. Most of the loaves turned out not so great, hard bricks, I think it was a combination of using too hot of water and not kneading long enough. Eventually the cook had enough, she was tried of having ingredients go to waste, the bread would sit out and not get eaten because it was a poor texture. She no longer let the crew make bread in the middle of the night.

I was really disappointed; my watch group had not rotated to the 12-4am watch so I didn’t get a chance to make bread. One afternoon when I saw the cook making bread I asked her if she would teach me, I knew there had to be more to it than just what the captain had shared. For whatever reason she saw potential in me, I followed direction well and we had a good relationship. From then on I was the only one allowed to make bread in the middle of the night. Eventually I came to her with recipes I’d picked out myself, soon those became everyone’s favorite and I perfected a variety of breads.

It was time to get serious about bread, I did a lot of research, eventually I discovered cold fermentation; make the dough, let it sit in the fridge for a few days, then bake it. Having everything sit together for a few days allows for more flavor development from the ingredients and the environment. Letting the bread spend up to 4 days in the fridge makes a huge difference, it develops so much flavor, I’d say it not even worth if if you only have time for it to sit overnight. This baguette is rich in flavor with a fluffy interior and a crunchy crust, take the time to make this and you’ll never want to buy a baguette again.

 















Baguette

 

Ingredients

  • 3 1/3 c all purpose flour
  • 2 c bread flour
  • 2 1/4 tsp. yeast (1 sachet)
  • 2 tsp. salt
  • 2 c water

Directions

  1. Important! This recipe must be made in advance, at least 1 day before baking, best if made 4 days in advance and stored in the refrigerator.
  2. Mix all of the dry ingredients together in the bowl of a stand mixer with a dough hook. Start the machine and in a steady stream pour in 1 ¾ cup of water, mix until it forms a shaggy ball, let rest 5 minutes so the flour has a chance to absorb the liquid, this prevents adding too much liquid to the dough and having to adjust with more flour.
  3. Turn the mixer back on to low speed and add the reaming water if needed, you are looking for a moist dough that pulls away from the sides of the bowl with no dryness. Knead the dough for 8 minutes. The dough should end up being tacky, sticks to your fingers but pulls away clean.
  4. Grease a large Tupperware or bowl, large enough to hold the dough when it doubles in size. After the bread has finished kneading place it in the prepared bowl and spray the top to reduce the surface drying. Cover and immediately refrigerate overnight or up to 4 days. I recommend at least 2 for more flavor, 4 for best flavor.
  5. On the day you want to bake, let the dough rest on the counter for 2 hours to come to room temperature. To shape the dough divide it in half, this is where I like to use a square container to let the dough rise in so that the shape is almost there to start with. Working lengthwise pull half of the dough to the center line pressing with your fingertips to seal it, bring the other half of the dough to the same centerline. Pinch the two sides together pulling the skin of the loaf tight, flip it over and make any final adjustments to the shape.
  6. Place both shaped loaves onto a greased tray, spray the top of the loaves with spray oil to prevent the skin from drying out, top with a towel and let rest for at least one hour, maybe longer if your kitchen is cold. You know your bread has risen enough when you lightly touch the bread and the dent remains.
  7. Preheat your oven to 550F or as high as your oven will go, place a rimmed baking tray on the lowest rack of the oven and allow to heat up with the oven.
  8. When the oven is hot and the bread risen slash the loaf, place in the oven and add a cup of water or ice cubes on the lower tray. Quickly close the door and turn down the oven to 450F. Bake for 30 minutes until you have an even golden brown crust.