salad

Kyoto Coleslaw

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I’ve always had a thing for cabbage, even if I was unaware of my love for coleslaw, it started back when I lived in Singapore.

In middle school one of my really good friends, Margaret, lived down the street from me, we’d often hang out on Friday afternoons. Her parents worked for the American embassy in Singapore and entertained fancy guests often, which meant their fridge was filled with tasty leftovers. We’d raid the fridge, go up stairs and watch movies for the afternoon nibbling on various tasty treats, Margaret’s fridge was the first place I tried tiramisu and that memory sticks well with me, but the other great thing I found among the shelves was this salad.

Spicy green cabbage and crunchy ramen noodles start to become soggy as they soak up a delicious sesame oil based salad dressing all brightened by rice wine vinegar. This makes for a great side dish along side Japanese inspired food or better still on it’s own in a large bowl with some grilled chicken slices.

 







Kyoto Coleslaw


Ingredients

Salad

  • 4 tbsp. sesame seeds
  • ½ c sliced almonds
  • 2 pkg ramen noodles, crushed
  • 1 large head green cabbage, shredded
  • ½ c green onions, sliced

Dressing

  • 6 tbsp. rice wine vinegar
  • ¼ c sesame oil
  • ¼ c canola oil
  • 2 tbsp. sugar
  • ½ tsp. ground pepper
  • ½ tsp. salt

Directions

Salad

  1. In a small pan toast the sesame seeds and almonds until they gain a little color and are fragrant, put them into a bowl, add the crushed ramen noodles and set aside for later.
  2. Shred the cabbage thinly by hand, with a food processor or my preferred method with a mandolin, add this to a large mixing bowl with the sliced green onions.

Dressing

  1. Mix all of the dressing ingredients together, wait to dress the salad until right before you serve, it’s no fun having a soggy salad.
  2. Sprinkle the toasted crunchy bits over the shredded cabbage, pour on most of the dressing and toss together, hold back some dressing to ensure that the salad is not over dressed, every cabbage is a different size.

Caramelized Shallot Orzo Salad

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If you dream of caramelized onions but need more substance than this is the pasta salad for you, but I refuse to call it pasta salad. In truth I hate pasta salad, well not every pasta salad, but most of them, they are greasy, gloppy and worst of all their main ingredient is cold pasta, that’s the part I hate. Cold pasta sticks to your teeth in a weird way and isn’t a pleasant texture, but depending on the pasta you use you can combat that problem. Orzo is the answer, the tiny little oval shaped pasta that people mistake for large rice.

Along with a bunch of caramelized shallots, onion’s fancy cousin, you have lots of lemon, bright green onions, spinach and crunches of toasted almond. This salad is great served at any temperature but I like it best slightly warm to room temperature, it also pairs well with seafood like my grilled halibut with citrus butter.

 





Caramelized Shallot Orzo Salad


Ingredients

  • 8 shallots or 1 large red onions
  • 8 garlic cloves, chopped
  • 10 green onions, sliced
  • ½ c whole almonds, toasted and chopped
  • 4 c packed spinach (½lb), roughly chopped
  • 1/2 c packed parsley, chopped
  • 2 tsp. salt
  • zest and juice of 1 lemons
  • 1/3 c olive oil
  • 2 ½ c uncooked orzo

Directions

  1. Put a pot of water on to boil while you prep the salad ingredients.
  2. Slice the shallots into half moons and caramelize on medium low heat with a little oil and pinch of salt. When they start to gain color and stick to the bottom of the pan add the garlic and sauté for another two minutes. Add the cooked shallots to a large mixing bowl.
  3. To the mixing bowl add sliced green onions, toasted and chopped almonds, spinach, parsley, salt, lemon zest and juice and the olive oil.
  4. When the salad ingredients are ready cook the orzo, once done drain and add to the salad ingredients, the heat from the hot orzo will wilt the spinach.
  5. Mix together, taste and adjust for seasoning, serve at any temperature, I like it at room temperature.

Mexican Corn and Bean Salad

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I adore Mexican food, but sometimes it can be a bit stogy, heavy refried beans and rich Spanish rice are not always refreshing during the summer. This salad is lighter than those traditional side dishes but just as substantial and filling. Charred corn, creamy black beans and sweet little cherry tomatoes are the base of this salad, some herbage is thrown in and everything is dressed with a little lime juice, olive oil and chili powder. I prefer to serve this salad slightly chilled, but it’s just as good at room temperature just after it comes together.

My two other favorite Mexican side dishes are lemon lime coleslaw and cabbage confetti salsa, yeah I like my cabbages.








Mexican Corn and Bean Salad


Ingredients

Salad

  • 10 oz cherry tomatoes
  • 4 c frozen corn
  • 1 -14oz can of black beans, drained and rinsed
  • ¼ red onion, diced
  • 1 c packed cilantro, chopped
  • 4 green onions, chopped

Dressing

  • 2 garlic cloves
  • zest and juice of 1 lime
  • 2 tbsp. apple cider vinegar
  • 2 tbsp. olive oil
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • ½ tsp. black pepper
  • ½ tsp. chili powder

Directions

Salad

  1. Cut the cherry tomatoes into quarters, toss with a pinch of salt and place in a colander, let drain while you prepare the rest of the salad. You can skip this step but the salad ends up a little watery.
  2. Preheat a pan on high heat, add the corn, cook until the kernels are brown and maybe a few edges are blackened. When the corn starts to pop out of the pan you know it’s done.
  3. Put all of the salad ingredients into a large bowl and make the dressing.

Dressing

  1. Crush the garlic into a small bowl and microwave for 30 seconds, this will remove the strong bite, add it to the salad along with the remaining ingredients.
  2. Toss everything together, serve at room temperature or chilled.

Carrot Miso Salad Dressing

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I didn’t start making my own salad dressing until after I left Bounty. When I first started off I bought the basics, Italian dressing and Ranch, I didn’t do much more than that because I had so many other things to think about and that was such a small detail. When I moved on to bigger boats and had a lot more time to think about food I realized how silly it was to buy salad dressing. I’m going to have oil and different vinegars on hand anyway and that’s the two basic ingredients for dressing, the rest is just flavor and fluff. The first salad dressing recipe that I did learn while sailing was this one, taught to me by Marcia, the women who taught me all about being a boat cook. She taught me how to cut corners, save money, stretch your product and ask for day old bread from bakeries in exchange for a tour of our cool boat.

Carrot miso salad dressing is the perfect accompaniment to most Asian inspired meals, the carrots add beautiful color and sweetness while the ginger and shallots add a sharp spicy bite. I serve this with a salad that has avocado, tomatoes and thinly sliced red onions as the salad goodies.

 






Carrot Miso Salad Dressing


Ingredients

  • 3 small carrots, roughly chopped (3 cups)
  • medium knob of fresh ginger, roughly chopped (1/4 cup)
  • 2 small shallots, roughly chopped (1/3 c)
  • 1/2 c white miso paste
  • 1/2 c rive wine vinegar
  • 1/2 c water
  • 1/2 c vegetable oil
  • 1/4 c sesame oil

Directions

  1. Put everything into a blender and blend for 1-2 minutes until smooth and combined. Serve with salad, I’d recommend avocado, tomato and sliced red onion as your salad goodies.

Golden Goddess Salad Dressing

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Finally, the long awaited recipe for golden goddess salad dressing is here!

The base of this dressing, where all of it’s golden flavor comes from is nutritional yeast or brewers yeast. Not the same kind of yeast you use to make bread or beer, it’s deactivated yeast, it’s found in a lot of vegan foods as a cheese flavoring substitute and is a significant source of some B vitamins. The first time I encountered nutritional yeast was from my husband; we were on Bounty and he was sprinkling what looked like yellow fish flakes on his eggs. He had it in a little glass jar with a large cork to seal it that said “hippie dust”. I didn’t really get into it until I had it sprinkled on buttered popcorn with a drizzle of soy sauce, heaven. It’s really popular on the west coast, they even have shakers of it at movie theaters in Eugene, Oregon.

I got the idea for this salad dressing my first year on Zodiac, one of the interns told me about a dressing that her dad makes. I pressed her for details, got what I needed and dove in. For whatever reason when I made this dressing for the first time I decided to measure my ingredients and take notes, back then I didn’t do that, ever, and I’m grateful I did because it was and is perfect. When people tell me how much they love this salad dressing I often think to myself “well duh, how could you not?” It’s my most requested recipe, it’s also one of the only things that I continuously make so lots of people have had it, I usually don’t repeat myself.

My husband dubbed this dressing Golden Goddess, a play on a very hippie dressing Green Goddess.

 







Golden Goddess Salad Dressing


Ingredients

  • 6 tbsp. nutritional yeast
  • ¼ c apple cider vinegar
  • 2 tbsp. water
  • 2 tbsp. soy sauce
  • 1 tsp. Dijon mustard
  • 1 garlic clove
  • ¼ c mayo
  • ¾ c canola oil (not olive oil, to much flavor)

Directions

  1. Stick everything in a blender, in the order indicated and blend till smooth and fully homogenized.

Lemon Lime Coleslaw

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52 weeks of cooking – On Sale

Boats and budgets go together in my mind, I started my carrier working for a boat where I was told the budget needed to be around $5 per person, per day for food expenses. That’s all three meals adding up to equal $5 for one person, it’s tight, it felt even tighter when I worked for Class Afloat and they told me how much fruit I needed to provide under that same budget. It does benefit that I buy in bulk, but there are still several ways to get around it, one of the key things is to know your produce.

Where ever I went I tried to ask for local produce, figure out what grew there and I’d buy a lot of it because it was likely to be cheaper. I also had to factor in what produce would last the longest if we wanted to eat fresh vegetables the whole way across the ocean and not just canned and frozen ones. Inevitably I ended up with a lot of cabbage, it’s cheap, it can last a few weeks outside of the refrigerator and it can be crisp and refreshing when you are craving a salad in hot weather. One of my favorite ways to prepare it has a few ingredients that aren’t so budget friendly and tend to not last for weeks.

I typically make this coleslaw with just green cabbage, but you can could also add some red cabbage, shredded carrot or slivers of multi color bell peppers. The dressing and the handful of herbs is what really makes this salad pop, chopped cilantro, green onions and the zest and juice of lemons and limes. I make my dressing sharp to the point it makes my mouth pucker a little and I want to suck the dressing from the cabbage. I dress the cabbage at the last minute before I serve it so the cabbage can stay crisp, it doesn’t hold well over time. I recommend serving this along side Mexican or South American flavored foods when you are looking for a crisp salad to balance the rest of your plate.

 







Lemon Lime Coleslaw


Ingredients

Salad

  • 1/2 a head green cabbage
  • 1/4 of a head red cabbage
  • 1 large carrot
  • 10 green onions
  • 1 bunch cilantro

Dressing

  • 1/2 lemon, zest and juice
  • 2 limes, zest and juice
  • 1/4 c olive oil
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1/2 tsp. pepper

Directions

Salad

  1. Slice the green and purple cabbage into thin strips, use a sharp knife or a mandolin. Grate the carrot and chop the green onions and cilantro. Place everything into a large bowl and chill until ready to serve.

Dressing

  1. Zest and then juice the lemon and limes into a cup, add the reaming dressing ingredients and stir to combine.
  2. Dress the salad at the last minute before you serve to keep the cabbage cool and crisp, toss well to combine.